A practical treatise on planting: and the management of woods and coppices (Google eBook)

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Printed by Wm. Sleater, printer to the Dublin Society; and sold by Allen & West, London., 1794 - Forests and forestry - 192 pages
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Page 103 - ... with a sixth part of the same quantity of the ashes of burnt bones ; put it into a tin box, with holes in the top, and shake the powder on the surface of the plaster, till the whole is covered over with it, letting it remain for half an hour, to absorb the moisture ; then apply more powder, rubbing it on gently with the hand, and repeating the application of the powder till the whole plaster becomes a dry smooth surface.
Page 50 - THE soil is composed of a mixture of sand and ' gravel; the hills abound most with the latter, * and the vallies with the former, as the smaller * particles are by the wind and rains brought, ' from time to time, from the high grounds to the * lower. It is on the hilly grounds we make our * plantations, which in time will make the vallies ' of much greater value, on account of the shelter ' they will afford. ' AFTER his Grace has fixed on...
Page 102 - ... ufed for the cielings of rooms. The Compofition being thus made, care muft be taken to prepare the tree properly for its application, by cutting away all the dead, decayed, and injured part, till you come to the frefh, found wood, leaving the furface of the wood very fmooth, and rounding off...
Page 110 - Shillelah oak the honour of roofing Westminster Hall, and other buildings of that age ; the timbers which support the leads of the magnificent chapel of King's College, Cambridge, which was built in 1444 ; as also the roof of Henry the Seventh's Chapel, in Westminster Abbey, are said to be of oak, brought from these woods;* and I think it by no means improbable,
Page 25 - ... ing of the roots, we only cut off the extreme parts ' that have been bruised by the taking up, or such ' as have been damaged by accident, wishing at all ' * times to plant with as much root as can be had. ' As soon as they are pruned they are taken to ' the planters, by the carriers, who are generally a ' set of boys, with some of the worst of the labour
Page 135 - Kildare stood an elm which, till the year 1762, was deemed the finest in the world. The diameter of the head, taken from the extremities of the lower branches, exceeded thirty-four yards; but in the end of that year the two principal arms fell from the trunk in one night, apparently from iheir own weight, as the weather was perfectly calm.
Page 103 - ... to be ufed afterwards fhould have an equal quantity of powder of alabafter mixed with it, in order the better to refift the dripping of trees and heavy rains.
Page 102 - ... fine before they are mixed ; then work them well together with a fpade, and afterwards with a wooden beater, until the ftuff is very fmooth, like fine plafter ufed for the cielings of rooms.
Page 103 - ... the edges of the bark with a drawknife, or other inftrument, perfectly fmooth, which muft be particularly attended to ; then lay on the plafler about one eighth of an inch thick, all over the part where...
Page 102 - May 11. 1791, gives the following directions " for making a composition for curing diseases, defects, and injuries in all kinds of fruit and forest trees, and the method of preparing the trees and laying on the composition. " Take one bushel of fresh cow-dung, half a bushel of lime rubbish of old buildings (that from the ceilings of rooms is preferable), half a bushel of wood-ashes, and a sixteenth part of a bushel of pit or river sand : the three last articles are to be sifted fine before they are...

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