People of the Deer

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Da Capo Press, Jul 21, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 287 pages
36 Reviews
In 1886, the Ihalmiut people of northern Canada numbered seven thousand; by 1946, when Farley Mowat began his two-year stay in the Arctic, the population had fallen to just forty. With them, he observed for the first time the phenomenon that would inspire him for the rest of his life: the millennia-old migration of the Arctic's caribou herds. He also endured bleak, interminable winters, suffered agonizing shortages of food, and witnessed the continual, devastating intrusions of outsiders bent on exploitation. Here, in this classic and first book to demonstrate the mammoth literary talent that would produce some of the most memorable books of the next half-century, best-selling author Farley Mowat chronicles his harrowing experiences. People of the Deer is the lyrical ethnography of a beautiful and endangered society. It is a mournful reproach to those who would manipulate and destroy indigenous cultures throughout the world. Most of all, it is a tribute to the last People of the Deer, the diminished Ihalmiuts, whose calamitous encounter with our civilization resulted in their unnecessary demise.
  

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Review: People Of The Deer

User Review  - Monty - Goodreads

I read the 1951 edition thinking I would be reading an anthropologically oriented book about indigenous people in Canada. Instead I was treated to a treatise on one man's experience living/traveling ... Read full review

Review: People Of The Deer

User Review  - April Sanders - Goodreads

OMG this was read a long time ago. Read full review

Contents

III
13
IV
25
V
38
VI
48
VII
66
VIII
85
IX
100
X
115
XIV
176
XV
192
XVI
209
XVII
222
XVIII
239
XIX
250
XX
269
XXI
281

XI
130
XII
145
XIII
160
XXII
298
XXIII
315
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

FARLEY MOWAT is the author of thirty-eight books, including No Man’s River and The Boat Who Wouldn’t Float, both available from Carroll & Graf. A veteran of World War II and an avid traveler, he began writing in 1949 after living for two years in the Arctic. His books have been translated into 24 languages and sold more than 14 million copies worldwide.