How to Protect Your Children on the Internet: A Roadmap for Parents and Teachers (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007 - Computers - 193 pages
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The Internet has transformed the way people research, shop, conduct business, and communicate. But the Internet and technologies that enable online interaction and access to a variety of content can be a perilous place for minors 8 to 18. The dangers are real, and parents and teachers today are confronted with many threats they simply do not understand. This book shares the risks of the Internet by detailing recent, real-world tragedies and revealing some of the secrets of online activities. It provides a pragmatic approach to help parents and teachers protect children against the threats of going online. Parents and teachers are often ill-equipped to deal with the variety of devices and applications such as email, instant messaging, browsing, blogs, cell phones, and personal digital assistant devices (PDAs) that can facilitate the dangers lurking online. How to Protect Your Children on the Internet offers a comprehensive overview of the ways in which youth use such technologies and exposes the risks they represent. At the same time, it provides a roadmap that will enable parents and teachers to become more engaged in children's online activities, arming them with techniques and tips to help protect their children. Smith underscores his arguments through chilling, real-life stories, revealing approaches people are using to deceive and to conceal their activities online. Filled with practical advice and recommendations, his book is indispensable to anyone who uses the Internet and related technologies, and especially to those charged with keeping children safe.
  

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Contents

A Road Map to Protect Children While Online
83
NOTES
171
BIBLIOGRAPHY
181

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Gregory S. Smith is Vice President and Chief Information Officer (CIO) of Information Technology at the World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C.and Adjunct Professor in the School of Professional Studies in Business and Education Graduate Programs at The Johns Hopkins University.

Bibliographic information