Education Between Two Worlds (Google eBook)

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Transaction Publishers, Jan 1, 2005 - Education - 303 pages
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Written in the midst of World War II, this book makes a strong argument for the crucial importance of education as the solution to the dilemmas with which our Anglo-Saxon culture was nurtured, with particular emphasis on the work of John Dewey and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

"The schools with which this argument is concerned are those of the Anglo-Saxon democracies of the last three centuries. In the life of England and America as we now know them, three hundred years of cultural change have moved on to a culminating and desperate crisis. That culture, in its religious and moral aspects, we have called Protestantism. On the economic and political side it has appeared as Capitalism. And these two together have established and maintained a way of life which we describe as Democratic. This book is devoted to an attempt to understand the education which is given by Anglo-Saxon democracies, to study the learning and teaching which have been done by a Protestant-capitalist civilization." from the Preface.

As the original foreword by Reginald Archambault indicates, "Fundamentally this is a book about education written by an educator who was anything but conservative and never merely theoretical. He is interested not only in educational theory but also in educational policy, and indeed, in pedagogy. The volume is invaluable, then, for the student of education, for it sheds critical light on the classic conceptions of education for the poor, and provides a heuristic statement of direction for the future." Stringfellow Barr, writing for the New Republic, indicates that this is "A wise and courageous book. I do not know how anybody concerned with education can ignore it." Mark van Doren in the Nation said, "As many readers as are interested in human happiness should go through this bookfor it is concerned with as important a theme as any I can imagine."Alexander Meiklejohn was president of Amherst College and later founder of the University of Wisconsin's Experimental College in 1928. His other major books include The Liberal College, Free Speech and Its Relation to the Government, and Political Freedom. Lionel Lewis is professor and former chair and director of graduate studies in the Department of Sociology at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is the author of Cold War on Campus and Marginal Worth, both available from Transaction.
  

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Contents

AldineTransaction Edition
ix
FOREWORD
xxix
PREFACE
xxxiii
FROM CHURCH TO STATE
3
JOHN AMOS COMENIUS
13
JOHN LOCKE
26
MATTHEW ARNOLD
36
THE FORCES OF DISINTEGRATION
56
THE WAR CRIES OF PRAGMATISM
137
KNOWLEDGE AND INTELLIGENCE
150
THE THEORY OF THE STATE
169
THE THEORY OF DEMOCRACY
182
THE DOCTRINE OF BROTHERHOOD
199
THE CUE FROM ROUSSEAU
210
REASONABLENESS IS REASONABLE
225
THE QUANTITY OF REASONABLENESS
236

JEAN JACQUES ROUSSEAU
71
THE FIRST OF THE MODERNS
86
CUSTOM AND INTELLIGENCETWO AUTHORITIES
96
THE TEACHER HAS TWO MASTERS
109
GENERAL FEATURES OF PRAGMATISM
123
THE QUALITY OF REASONABLENESS
250
THE STATE AND THE INDIVIDUAL
262
THE GENERAL THEORY OF EDUCATION
277
INDEX
293
Copyright

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Page xxii - The problem is to find a form of association which will defend and protect with the whole common force the person and goods of each associate, and in which each, while uniting himself with all, may still obey himself alone, and remain as free as before.
Page xxiii - Each of us puts his person and all his power in common under the supreme direction of the general will, and, in our corporate capacity, we receive each member as an indivisible part of the whole.

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