Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In; Second Edition

Front Cover
Penguin, Dec 1, 1991 - Business & Economics - 224 pages
73 Reviews
Getting to Yes offers a concise, step-by-step, proven strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict—whether it involves parents and children, neighbors, bosses and employees, customers or corporations, tenants or diplomats. Based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals continually with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution from domestic to business to international, Getting to Yes tells you how to: * Separate the people from the problem; * Focus on interests, not positions; * Work together to create options that will satisfy both parties; and * Negotiate successfully with people who are more powerful, refuse to play by the rules, or resort to "dirty tricks." Since its original publication in 1981, Getting to Yes has been translated into 18 languages and has sold over 1 million copies in its various editions. This completely revised edition is a universal guide to the art of negotiating personal and professional disputes. It offers a concise strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict.
  

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Review: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

User Review  - Graham Herrli - Goodreads

This is the kind of book where after you read it, you think, "bah, of course I knew that already," but then the next day you find yourself using some of its principles consciously in a discussion, and ... Read full review

Review: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

User Review  - John - Goodreads

(and the method, obviously) really concerned itself and was very much focused on using REASONING and OBJECTIVE CRITERIA as the basis for reaching an agreement in a negotiation, by solving each others ... Read full review

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Contents

Arguing over positions produces unwise agreements
Arguing over positions Is Inefficient
Arguing over positions endangers an ongoing relationship
Being nice is no answer
There Is an alternative
Negotiators are people first
In the substance and In the relationship
Separate the relationship from the substance deal directly with the people problem
The case for using objective criteria
Developing objective criteria
Negotiating with objective criteria
Its company policy
Protecting yourself
Making the most of your assets
When the other side Is powerful
Negotiation jujitsu

Perception
Emotion
Communication
Prevention works best
For a wise solution reconcile Interests not positions
How do you Identify Interests?
Talking aboutInterests
DIAGNOSIS
PRESCRIPTION
Deciding on the basis of will Is costly
Consider the onetext procedure
The case of Jones Realty and Frank Turnbull
How do you negotlate about the rules of the game?
Some common tricky tactics
Dont be a victim
Questions About Fairness and Principled Negotiation
Questions About Dealing with People
Questions About Tactics
Questions About Power
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Roger Fisher is the Samuel Williston Professor Emeritus of Law at Harvard, director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, and founder of two consulting organizations.
Daniel Shapiro, associate director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, teaches at Harvard Law School and in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School.

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