The Complete Works of John Lyly, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Clarendon Press, 1902
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Page 542 - They say, miracles are past; and we have our philosophical persons, to make modern and familiar, things supernatural and causeless. Hence is it, that we make trifles of terrors, ensconcing ourselves into seeming knowledge, when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fear.
Page 295 - Pucelle and Perdita (WT iv. 4. 663-72), is original in Lyly; and Viola in her page's dress, half absently confessing I am all the daughters of my father's house, And all the brothers too, reminds us strongly of Phillida's forgetfulness in a similar situation (iii. 2)' My father had but one daughter, and therefore I could
Page 520 - P. 162, 6. my -wit . . . grosse diot, &c.: in Tw. Night, i. 3. 90 Sir Andrew says, ' I am a great eater of beef, and, I believe, that does harm to my wit.' In Tro. and Cress, ii. I. 14 Thersites calls Ajax ' beef-witted' (Aldis Wright). 36. Chestes: so Pappe, vol. iii. p. 395
Page 510 - i. 275 1. 17 (note). 25. forge nothing of malice, &c.: recalled by Shakespeare, Oth. v. 2. 342-3 ' Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, | Nor set down aught in malice.
Page 249 - But our Comedians, thinke there is no delight without laughter, which is very wrong, for though laughter may come with delight, yet commeth it not of delight: as though delight should be the cause of laughter, but well may one thing breed both together: nay, rather in
Page 249 - laugh; wee shall contrarily laugh sometimes, to finde a matter quite mistaken, and goe downe the hill agaynst the byas, in the mouth of some such men, as for the respect of them, one shalbe hartely sorry, yet he cannot chuse but laugh; and
Page 341 - teeme of sparows; Looses them too; then, downe he throwes The corrall of his lippe, the rose Growing on's cheek (but none knows how), With these, the cristall of his Brow,
Page 341 - and my Campaspe playd At Cardes for kisses, Cupid payd; He stakes his Quiuer, Bow, & Arrows, 65 His Mothers doues, & teeme of sparows; Looses them too; then, downe he throwes The corrall of his lippe, the rose Growing on's cheek (but none knows how), With these, the cristall of his Brow,
Page 280 - And lastly, if, considering Lyly's date and the condition of dramatic art, we may speak of his women merely as a single class, he deserves the highest praise for his representation of them. True, he gives us for the most part only their outward husk of wit and raillery and flirtation. It is Woman in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, that he chiefly paints; the
Page 320 - Daiery, 90 O these draughts would make vs merry. Psyllus. O for a. wench, (I deale in faces, And in other dayntier things,) Tickled am I with her Embraces, Fine dancing in such Fairy Ringes. 95 Manes. O for a plump fat leg of Mutton, Veale, Lambe, Capon, Pigge,