Institutes of Hindu Law: Or, The Ordinances of Menu, According to the Gloss of Cullúca (Google eBook)

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order of the government., 1796 - Hindu law - 366 pages
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Page iv - ... system of duties, religious and civil, and of law in all its branches, which the Hindus firmly believe to have been promulged in the beginning of time by MENU, son or grandson of BRAHMA', or, in plain language, the first of created beings, and not the oldest only, but the holiest, of legislators...
Page 198 - A king, even though a child, must not be treated lightly, from an idea that he is a mere mortal: no, he is a powerful divinity, who appears in a human shape.
Page 208 - Calling to mind the duty of honourable men, let him never slay one, who has broken his weapon; nor one, who is afflicted with private sorrow; nor one, who has been grievously wounded; nor one, who is terrified; nor one, who turns his back.
Page 6 - GOD, and the harsh admonitions even to kings, are truly noble ; and the many panegyricks on the Gayatri, the Mother, as it is called, of the Veda, prove the author to have adored (not the...
Page 144 - "well and good," or let him say, "well," only; but let him not maintain fruitless enmity and altercation with any man. 140. "Let him not journey too early in the morning or too late in the evening, nor .too near the mid-day, nor with an unknown companion, nor alone, nor with men of the servile class.
Page 5 - The work, now presented to the European world, contains abundance of curious matter extremely interesting both to speculative lawyers and antiquaries, with many beauties, which need not be pointed out, and with many blemishes, which cannot be justified or palliated. It is a system of despotism and priestcraft, both indeed limited by law, but artfully conspiring to give mutual support...
Page 186 - Or the hermit may bring food from a town, having received it in a basket of leaves, in his naked hand, or in a potsherd ; and then let him swallow eight mouthfuls.
Page 229 - Of injustice in decisions, one quarter falls on the ' party in the cause ; one quarter, on his witnesses ; one ' quarter, on all the judges ; and one quarter on the king ; 19. ' But where he, who deserves condemnation...
Page 184 - Let him be constantly engaged in reading the Veda; patient of all extremities, universally benevolent, with a mind intent on the Supreme Being ; a perpetual giver, but no receiver of gifts ; with tender affection for all animated bodies.
Page 279 - Let the king establish rules for the sale and ' purchase of all marketable things, having duly con' sidered whence they come, if imported ; and, if ea'port' ed, whither they must be sent; how long they have been 'kept; what may be gained by them ; and what has

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