Heraldic anomalies [by E.Nares]. (Google eBook)

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Page 55 - Where wealth accumulates, and men decay : Princes and lords may flourish, or may fade ; A breath can make them, as a breath has made ; But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, When once destroyed, can never be supplied. A time there was, ere England's griefs began, When every rood of ground maintain'd its man: For him light Labour spread her wholesome store, Just gave what life required, but gave no more; His best companions, innocence and health, And his best riches, ignorance of wealth.
Page 54 - Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates and men decay: Princes and lords may flourish or may fade; A breath can make them, as a breath has made; But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, When once destroyed, can never be supplied.
Page 55 - Those healthful sports that grac'd the peaceful scene, Liv'd in each look, and brighten'd all the green ; These, far departing, seek a kinder shore, And rural mirth and manners are no more.
Page 50 - What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul. The philosopher, the saint, or the hero — the wise, the good, or the great man — very often lies hid and concealed in a plebeian, which a proper education might have disinterred, and have brought to light.
Page 234 - He has, moreover, bequeathed to the chaplain a very pretty tenement with good lands about it. It being a very cold day when he made his will, he left for mourning, to every man in the parish, a great frieze coat, and to every woman a black ridinghood.
Page 235 - When we were arrived upon the verge of his estate, we stopped at a little inn to rest ourselves and our horses. The man of the house had it seems been formerly a servant in the knight's family; and to do honour to his old master, had some time since, unknown to Sir ROGER, put him up in a sign-post before the door; so that the knight's head had hung out upon the road about a week before he himself knew anything of the matter.
Page 163 - These are the chief legal effects of marriage during the coverture ; upon which we may observe, that even the disabilities which the wife lies under are for the most part intended for her protection and benefit. So great a favorite is the female sex of the laws of England...
Page 74 - On Christmas eve the mass was sung; That only night, in all the year, Saw the stoled priest the chalice rear— : The damsel donned her kirtle sheen; The hall was dressed with holly green ; Forth to the wood did merry men go, To gather in the misletoe.
Page 67 - Beat the broad gates, a goodly hollow sound, With double echoes, doth again rebound ; But not a dog doth bark to welcome thee, Nor churlish porter canst thou chafing see. All dumb and silent, like the dead of night, Or dwelling of some sleepy Sybarite ; The marble pavement hid with desert weed, With house-leek, thistle, dock, and hemlock seed. ******** Look to the tow'red chimnies, which should be The wind-pipes of good hospitality, Through which it breatheth to the open air, Betokening life and...
Page 61 - With an old study fill'd full of learned old books, With an old reverend chaplain, you might know him by his looks. With an old buttery hatch worn quite off the hooks, And an old kitchen, that maintain'd half a dozen old cooks; Like an old courtier, &c.

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