The world in the evening

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Random House, 1954 - Fiction - 301 pages
6 Reviews

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Review: The World In The Evening

User Review  - James Weisbach - Goodreads

I adore Isherwood, and this book is one of my favorites of his. It's a book about self-knowledge, and succeeds based off of a combination of compelling characters and gorgeous prose. I also love his ... Read full review

Review: The World In The Evening

User Review  - Lee - Goodreads

Meandering but rich full of the interpenetration of theatricality and devastating reality, childish pretend and adult ruins: perverse things going on in playhouses, movies too labor-intensive to watch, emotional repression and sublimation. Read full review

Contents

Contents
3
part two Letters and Life
49
part three A Beginning
269
Copyright

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About the author (1954)

Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986) was one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. He left Cambridge without graduating, briefly studied medicine, and then turned to writing his first novels, "All the Conspirators" and "The Memorial". Between 1929 and 1939, he lived mainly abroad in Europe, spending four years in Berlin and writing the novels "Mr Norris Changes Trains" and "Goodbye to Berlin", on which the musical "Cabaret" was based. He wrote three plays with W. H. Auden and emigrated with him to the United States in 1939. Auden settled in New York, and Isherwood went on to California, where he became a successful screenwriter. He took United States citizenship in 1946 and wrote another five novels, including "Prater Violet", "Down There on a Visit", and "A Single Man". He also wrote a travel book about South America and a biography of the Indian mystic Ramakrishna. In the late 1960s and the 1970s, he turned to autobiography--"Kathleen and Frank", "Christopher and His Kind", "My Guru and His Disciple"--and published "October", one month of his diary illustrated with drawings by Don Bachardy.

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