Narrative

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 267 pages
1 Review
This comprehensive, accessible guidebook traces the ways in which human beings have used narrative to make sense of time, space and identity over the centuries. Particular attention is given to:
* early narrative, from Hellenic and Hebraic
* the rise of the novel
* realist representation
* imperialism and narrative
* modernism and cinema
* postmodern narrative
* narrative and new technologies.
With a strong emphasis on clarity and a range of examples from oral cultures to cyberspace, this is the ideal guide to an essential critical topic.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

In the beginning the end
1
Story plot and narrative
4
Sequence
7
Space
12
Time
16
Phylogeny and ontogeny
21
Early narrative
29
Narrative and history
30
Realism and the voices of narrative
104
Narrative with dirt under its fingernails
107
Beyond realism
117
Imperialism and repression
123
Imperialism and sexuality
127
Narrative imperialism and the conflict of Western identity
132
The reader and the narrative
134
Narrative levels
138

Orality literacy and narrative
32
Universality and narrative
33
Narrative and identity
37
Hellenic and Hebraic foundations
41
Hybridity and the Western tradition
51
A voyage to the self
53
The rise and rise of the novel
56
Mimesis
57
Aristotelian mimesis
61
Imitation quotation and identity
63
Epic identity and the mixed mode
67
Questioning the voice in the Middle Ages
70
The low form of the romance and the rise of the novel
74
The triple rise thesis and beyond
77
Instruction telling and narrative mode
81
Realist representation
88
Secretaries to the nineteenth century
89
Battles over realism
91
Middlemarch and classic realism
94
Omniscient narration
100
Modernism and the cinema
146
Writing in light
153
The cinema and modernism
163
Just another realism?
167
Postmodernism
171
Meta levels
174
History
179
The decline of the grand narrative
183
New technologies
189
In the end the beginning
201
Narrative in cyberspace
202
Reading narrative
205
Diversity and genres
209
Closure verisimilitude
215
The future of the narrative sign
223
GLOSSARY
229
BIBLIOGRAPHY
246
INDEX
261
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

Paul Cobley is Reader in Communications at London Guildhall University. He is author of The American Thriller and Introducing Semiotics, and editor of The Communication Theory Reader, The Routledge Companion to Semiotics and Linguistics and (with Adam Briggs) The Media: An Introduction. Guildhall University. He is the author of Routledge's Communication Theory Reader.

Bibliographic information