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Books Books 1 - 8 of 8 on to the honor of the Englishe tong, and for profite of the studious of Englishe eloquence,....  
" to the honor of the Englishe tong, and for profite of the studious of Englishe eloquence, those workes which the ungentle horders up of such treasure have heretofore envied thee. And for this point (good reder) thine own profit and pleasure in these presently,... "
A Bibliographical and Critical Account of the Rarest Books in the English ... - Page 121
by John Payne Collier - 1866
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The works of the English poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: including the series ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry (Collections) - 1810
...reader) that thou thinke it not euyll done, to publishe to the honor of the Englishe tong, and for profit of the studious of Englishe eloquence, those workes...ungentle horders up of such treasure have heretofore enuied thee. And for this point (good reader) thine owne profile and pleasure, in these presently,...
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The poems of Henry Howard, earl of Surrey, Volume 43

Henry Howard Surrey (Earl of) - Literary Criticism - 1866 - 180 pages
...the honour of the English tongue, and for profit of the studious of English eloquence, those works which the ungentle horders up of such treasure have heretofore envied thee. And for this point, good reader, thine own profit and pleasure, in these presently, and in more hereafter, shall answer for...
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Still Rebels, Still Yankees: And Other Essays

Donald Davidson - Literary Collections - 1999 - 308 pages
...that thou thinke it not evill doon, to publish, to the honor of the English tong, and for the profit of the studious of Englishe eloquence, those workes...up of such treasure have heretofore envied thee.” Mr. Hyder Rollins takes this as Tottel's complaint against the “anti-publication complex” of the...
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Patronage, Politics, and Literary Traditions in England, 1558-1658

Cedric Clive Brown - Authors and patrons - 1993 - 309 pages
...reder) that thou thinke it not evill doon, to publish, to the honor of the Englishe tong, and for profit of the studious of Englishe eloquence, those workes...pleasure, in these presently, and in moe hereafter, shal answere for my defence. If parhappes some mislike the statelinesse of stile removed from the rude...
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The Imprint of Gender: Authorship and Publication in the English Renaissance

Wendy Wall - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 373 pages
...evill doone, to publish, to the honor of the English long, and for profit of the studious of English eloquence, those workes which the ungentle horders up of such treasure have heretofore envied thee" (2, my emphasis). In labeling the "horders" of such texts as "ungentle," Tottel reverses the class...
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Manuscript, Print, and the English Renaissance Lyric

Arthur F. Marotti - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 348 pages
...reder) that thou thinke it not evill doon, to publish, to the honor of the Englishe long, and for profit of the studious of Englishe eloquence, those workes...have heretofore envied thee. And for this point (good reader) thine own profit and pleasure, in these presently, and in moe hereafter, shal answere for my...
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The Making of the English Literary Canon: From the Middle Ages to the Late ...

Trevor Ross - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 400 pages
...reder) that thou thinke it not evill doon, to publish, to the honor of the Englishe long, and for profit of the studious of Englishe eloquence, those workes...which the ungentle horders up of such treasure have hereto envied thee. And for this point (good reder) thine own profit and pleasure, in these presently,...
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Sonnet Sequences and Social Distinction in Renaissance England

Christopher Warley - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 240 pages
...evill done, to publish, to the honor of the English long, and for profit of the studious of English eloquence, those workes which the ungentle horders up of such treasure have heretofore envied thee") 23 as emphasizing not the superiority of such aristocratic "treasures" but the power of those acquiring...
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