The Early Modern Ottomans: Remapping the Empire

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Virginia H. Aksan, Daniel Goffman
Cambridge University Press, Jul 26, 2007 - History - 363 pages
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A groundbreaking reinterpretation of the middle years of the Ottoman Empire, from the conquest of Byzantium in 1453 to the establishment of the Tanzimat in 1839. This period saw the evolution of the Empire from the height of its powers to - as the traditional view has it - an empire in decline, unable to modernise in the face of globalisation and European ascendancy. The contributors challenge this view, demonstrating how the Ottomans came to be modern on their own terms. They explore the Ottomans as politicians and diplomats, military reformers, artists and historians. They also map out and redefine the material worlds which they inhabited - the courthouse, the cemetery, the Turkish garden. This book, which represents a turning-point in the intellectual history of the Ottoman Empire, promises to become a key text for students, scholars and anyone interested in the Ottoman world.
  

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Contents

Section 1
27
Section 2
31
Section 3
38
Section 4
51
Section 5
53
Section 6
61
Section 7
75
Section 8
104
Section 10
167
Section 11
201
Section 12
213
Section 13
233
Section 14
256
Section 15
277
Section 16
279
Section 17
294

Section 9
117
Section 18
295

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About the author (2007)

Virginia H. Aksan is Associate Professor of History at McMaster University, Ontario. Her publications include An Ottoman Statesman in War and Peace: Ahmed Resmi Efendi, 1700-1783 (1995) and Ottomans and Europeans: Contacts and Conflicts (2004).

Daniel Goffman is Professor and Chair of History at DePaul University and author of Britons in the Ottoman Empire; Izmir and the Levantine World (1998), and The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe (2002).

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