Hygia: Or, Essays Moral and Medical on the Causes Affecting the Personal State of Our Middling and Affluent Classes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Phillips, 1802 - Medicine, Popular
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Page 90 - I have given suck, and know How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me: I would, while it was smiling in my face, Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums, And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you Have done to this.
Page iii - Now have we many chimnies; and yet out tender**** complain of rheums, catarrhs, and poses; then had we none but reredosses, and our heads did never ache. For as the smoke in those days was supposed to be a sufficient hardening for the timber of the house, so it was reputed a far better medicine to keep the good man and his family from the quacke or pose, wherewith, as then, very few were acquainted.
Page 60 - Turn, gentle hermit of the dale, And guide my lonely way To where yon taper cheers the vale With hospitable ray. " For here forlorn and lost I tread, With fainting steps and slow ; Where wilds immeasurably spread, Seem lengthening as I go.'" " Forbear, my son," the hermit cries, " To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom. " Here to the houseless child of want My door is open still ; And though my portion is but scant, I give it with good will.
Page 25 - ... spirit of wine of commerce, mixed with a single drachm of water, were poured down the throat of one of the animals. In five hours both were opened, within a very few minutes of each other. The animal to which the spirit was given had its stomach nearly twice as full as its fellow. The bits of flesh were as angular as immediately after they were cut off by the knife, at the time of feeding.
Page 84 - Long may thy hardy sons of rustic toil Be blest with health, and peace, and sweet content! And oh ! may Heaven their simple lives prevent From luxury's contagion, weak and vile ! Then, howe'er crowns and coronets be rent, A virtuous populace may rise the while, And stand a wall of fire around their much-loved Isle. O Thou! who pour'd the patriotic tide That stream'd thro...
Page 26 - many hours, and even a whole night, after a debauch in wine, it is common enough to reject a part or the whole of a dinner undigested." I hold that those who abstain from alcohol have the best digestion; and that more instances of indigestion, of flatulency, of acidity, and of depression of mind and body, are produced by alcohol than by any other single cause.
Page 34 - ... distilled liquors, which they swallow with so much avidity themselves. Among the causes, fatal to the health of the higher classes, the allowance of wine, that is so often served out to the children, short as it may appear, deserves to be considered as not the least considerable.
Page 40 - ... which may prove fatal. I once knew an instance of four young men, who, having worked at harvest in the heat of the day, with a view of refreshing themselves plunged into a spring of cold water ; two died upon the spot, a third the next morning, and the fourth recovered with great difficulty.
Page iii - Now have we many chimneys ; and yet our tenderlings complain of rheums, catarrhs, and poses ; then had we none but reredosses, and our heads did never ache. For as the smoke in those days was supposed to be a sufficient hardening for the timber of the house, so it was reputed a far better medicine to keep the good-man and his family from the quack or pose, wherewith, as then, very few were acquainted.
Page 4 - Consumption may be regarded as a vast pit-fall, situated on the high road of life, which we have no sense enough of our common interest to agree to fill up, or fence round, heedless fathers and mothers are for ever guiding their sons and daughters directly into it".

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