American Annals of Education (Google eBook)

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Otis, Broaders, 1834 - Education
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Page 123 - man, whether he be influenced by the lust of money, or of power, or like Cain, by the demands of mortified pride or disappointed rivalry, —-even though they be self-baptised, with the name of ' wounded honor'— ' And now art thou cursed from the earth, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother's blood from thy hand ! When thou
Page 379 - bid'st Unargued I obey — so God ordains— God is thy law, thou mine; to know no more, Is woman's happiest knowledge and her praise." And what is the discipline by which we seek to prepare this gentle being for the love-inspiring offices of her station
Page 377 - thy law, thou mine; to know no more, Is woman's happiest knowledge and her praise." And what is the discipline by which we seek to prepare this gentle being for the love-inspiring offices of her station
Page 357 - He had reached his fifth or sixth year, knew the alphabet, and could read a little, but had received no particular information with respect to the Author of his being. In the corner of a little garden, without informing any person of the circumstance, I wrote in the mould, with my
Page 62 - After the child hath learned perfectly the eight parts of speech, let him then learn the right joining together of substantives with adjectives, the noun with the verb, the relative with the antecedent. * * * Let the master read unto him the Epistles of Cicero, gathered together and chosen out by Sturmius, for the capacity of children.
Page 357 - In the corner of a little garden, without informing any person of the circumstance, I wrote in the mould, with my finger, the initials of his name, and sowing garden cresses in the furrow, covered up the seed, and smoothed the ground. Ten days after, he came running to roe with astonishment on his countenance, and told me his name
Page 66 - knowledge of the tongue itself, reading alone, as I have said, will attain this end, without charging the mind with the multiplied rules and intricacies of grammar.' He then goes on to recommend the double translation of Roger Ascham, but it is not necessary to repeat it. Our object lias been to give in detail a plan for beginning
Page 189 - the eyes to behold the sun.' The sense of sight is, indeed, the highest bodily privilege, the purest physical pleasure, which man has derived from his Creator: — to see that wandering lire, after he has finished his journey through the nations, coming back to us in the eastern heavens; the mountains painted with light; the
Page 213 - study then, — in order. Let the next be indeed the next. ' The purest way for a learner,' says Locke, ' is not to advance by jumps and large strides,—let that which he sets himself to learn next, be indeed the next; ie as nearly conjoined with what
Page 189 - splendor of the sea; the earth waking from deep slumber; the day flowing down the sides of the hills, till it reaches the secret valleys; the little insect recalled to life; the bird trying her wings; man going forth to his labor; each created being moving, thinking, acting, contriving, according to the scheme and compass of its

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