A Collection of College Words and Customs (Google eBook)

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J. Bartlett, 1856 - Students - 508 pages
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Page 414 - Our lips shall tell them to our sons, And they again to theirs, That generations yet unborn May teach them to their heirs.
Page 336 - An Act for the further security of His Majesty's Person and Government and the succession of the Crown in the Heirs of the late Princess Sophia being Protestants and for extinguishing the hopes of the late pretended Prince of Wales and his open and secret Abettors...
Page 415 - Let the instructions of my mouth Deep in your hearts descend. 2 My tongue, by inspiration taught, Shall parables unfold, Dark oracles, but understood, And owned for truths of old ; 3 Which we from sacred registers Of ancient times have known, And our forefathers' pious care To us has handed down.
Page 285 - The scholars shall never use their mother tongue, except that in public exercises of oratory, or such like, they be called to make them in English.
Page 416 - Hear, O my people ; to my law Devout attention lend ; Let the instruction of my mouth Deep in your hearts descend. My tongue, by inspiration taught, Shall parables unfold, Dark oracles, but understood, And owned for truths of old ; Which we from sacred registers Of ancient times have known, And our forefathers' pious care To us has handed down.
Page 214 - No Undergraduate shall wear his hat in the College yard when any of the Governors of the College are there; and no Bachelor shall wear his hat when the President is there. "4. No Freshman shall speak to a Senior 4 * with his hat on, or have it on in a Senior's chamber, or in his own, if a Senior be there.
Page 4 - When any scholar is able to read Tully, or such like classical Latin author, extempore, and make and speak true Latin in verse and prose suo (ut aiunt) Marte, and decline perfectly the paradigms of nouns and verbs in the Greek tongue, then may he be admitted into the college, nor shall any claim admission before such qualifications.
Page 112 - In this court all causes are tried and determined by the civil and statute law, and by the custom of the University.
Page 189 - O relic and type of our ancestors' worth That has long kept their memory warm, First flower of their wilderness, star of their night, Calm rising through change and through storm.
Page 145 - Minsheu says it was only half that sum, and thus particularly explains it: " Because they set down in the battling or butterie bookes in Oxford and Cambridge" the letter q for half a farthing ; and in Oxford when they make that cue or qa farthing, they say, cap my q, and make it a farthing, thus, J. But in Cambridge they use this letter, a little f; thus, f, or thus, s, for a farthing." He translates it in Latin calculus panis. Coles has, " A cue [half a farthing] minutum.

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