Luther and the Lutheran Reformation, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. & J. Harper, 1833 - Reformation
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 261 - But the wisdom that is from above, is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy. And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace of them that make peace.
Page 216 - Refrain from these men and let them alone : for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to naught; but if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it, lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 200 - Thy dead men shall live, Together with my dead body shall they arise. Awake and sing, ye that dwell in dust: For thy dew is as the dew of herbs, And the earth shall cast out the dead.
Page 347 - A DESCRIPTION OF PITCAIRN'S ISLAND, AND ITS INHABITANTS. With an Authentic Account of the Mutiny of the Ship Bounty, and of the subsequent Fortunes of the Mutineers.
Page 197 - ... none of these things moved him, neither counted he his life dear unto himself, so that he might finish his course with joy, and the ministry which he had received of the Lord Jesus, to testify the Gospel of the grace of God.
Page 183 - He is our God, even the God of whom cometh salvation : God is the Lord, by whom we escape death.
Page 20 - The condition of man after the fall of Adam is such that he cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith, and calling upon God : Wherefore we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
Page 200 - Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee : hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast.
Page 188 - ... disappointed him in this particular, a torrent of invective, mingled with contempt. Regardless of any distinction of rank or character when his doctrines were attacked, he chastised all his adversaries indiscriminately, with the same rough hand ; neither the royal dignity of Henry VIII. nor the eminent learning and abilities of Erasmus...
Page 189 - But these indecencies of which Luther was guilty must not be imputed wholly to the violence of his temper : they ought to be charged in part on the manners of the age. Among a rude people, unacquainted with those maxims which, by putting continual restraint on the passions of individuals, have polished society, and rendered it agreeable, disputes of every kind were managed with heat, and strong emotions were uttered in their natural language, without reserve or delicacy. At the same time, the works...

Bibliographic information