MindScience: an East-West dialogue

Front Cover
Wisdom Publications, 1991 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 137 pages
2 Reviews
What is the subtle relationship between mind and body? What can today's scientists learn about this relationship from masters of Buddhist thought? Is it possible that by combining Western and Eastern approaches, we can reach a new understanding of the nature of the mind, the human potential for growth, the possibilities for mental and physical health? "MindScience" explores these and other questions as it documents the beginning of an historic dialogue between modern science and Buddhism, based on a day-long Harvard Medical School symposium in which The Harvard Mind Science Symposium brought together the Dalai Lama and authorities from the fields of psychiatry, psychology, neuroscience, and education. Here, they examine myriad questions concerning the nature of the mind and its relationship to the body.

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Review: MindScience: An East-West Dialogue

User Review  - Darice - Goodreads

Great introduction to profound spiritual and psychological thoughts that are being connected and synthesized into a vision of the transcendence of consciousness. Read full review

Review: MindScience: An East-West Dialogue

User Review  - Frank Jude - Goodreads

Originally published in 1991, this book is already dated -- and that's a good thing! It remains of interest for cultural history reasons, but so much has been published around the interface of ... Read full review

Contents

A Western Perspective
3
Dialogue
19
MindBody Interactions including Tibetan Studies
39
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

The exiled 14th Dalai Lama was born on July 6, 1935 to a peasant family living in a former Tibetan village. He was recognized as the reincarnation of the previous spiritual leader of his nation at the age of two and enthroned on February 22, 1940. In 1959 he and 100,000 followers fled the country following a failed revolt against the Communist Chinese forces that had occupied Tibet for almost a decade. Since that time, the Dalai Lama has met with numerous world leaders and U. N. officials in a tireless effort to free his country and preserve the traditional Tibetan way of life. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 and has been awarded honorary citizenships by many international cities and countries, as well as multiple honorary degrees and human rights awards. In 2007 the Dalai Lama received the United States Congressional Gold Medal. He has written many books and lectures around the world.

Daniel Coleman is an associate professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University.