Here Comes Everybody: How Change Happens when People Come Together

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Penguin Adult, Feb 5, 2009 - Business & Economics - 352 pages
51 Reviews

Welcome to the new future of involvement. Forming groups is easier than it s ever been: unpaid volunteers can build an encyclopaedia together in their spare time, mistreated customers can join forces to get their revenge on airlines and high street banks, and one man with a laptop can raise an army to help recover a stolen phone.

The results of this new world of easy collaboration can be both good (young people defying an oppressive government with a guerrilla ice-cream eating protest) and bad (girls sharing advice for staying dangerously skinny) but it s here and, as Clay Shirky shows, it s affecting well, everybody. For the first time, we have the tools to make group action truly a reality. And they re going to change our whole world.

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Review: Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations

User Review  - Elizabeth Licata - Goodreads

I realized about a third of the way through this book that I made a mistake in reading it after Cognitive Surplus. Since Shirky wrote this book first, many of his concepts are refined more in his ... Read full review

Review: Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations

User Review  - Judyta Szaciłło - Goodreads

If you have spent the last 20 years of your life in blissful ignorance of what was happening around you, it may as well turn out to be a fascinating book for you. However, if you are capable of ... Read full review

About the author (2009)

Clay Shirky writes, teaches, and consults on the social and economic effects of the internet. A professor at NYU s Interactive Telecommunications Program, he has consulted for Nokia, Procter and Gamble, News Corp., the BBC, the US Navy, and Lego. Over the years, his writings have appeared in The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Harvard Business Review, Wired, and IEEE Computer.

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