After Art (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, Oct 28, 2012 - Art - 136 pages
3 Reviews

Art as we know it is dramatically changing, but popular and critical responses lag behind. In this trenchant illustrated essay, David Joselit describes how art and architecture are being transformed in the age of Google. Under the dual pressures of digital technology, which allows images to be reformatted and disseminated effortlessly, and the exponential acceleration of cultural exchange enabled by globalization, artists and architects are emphasizing networks as never before. Some of the most interesting contemporary work in both fields is now based on visualizing patterns of dissemination after objects and structures are produced, and after they enter into, and even establish, diverse networks. Behaving like human search engines, artists and architects sort, capture, and reformat existing content. Works of art crystallize out of populations of images, and buildings emerge out of the dynamics of the circulation patterns they will house.

Examining the work of architectural firms such as OMA, Reiser + Umemoto, and Foreign Office, as well as the art of Matthew Barney, Ai Weiwei, Sherrie Levine, and many others, After Art provides a compelling and original theory of art and architecture in the age of global networks.

  

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Review: After Art

User Review  - Mayee - Goodreads

Joselit takes the paradigm of currency/circulation drawing from notions of the postindustrial knowledge economy, and applies it to contemporary art. mostly notes on a framework which is not very ... Read full review

Review: After Art

User Review  - Egor Sofronov - Goodreads

As my teacher put it, a bit stuffy. Yes, it is somewhat jumbled, and reads like preliminary notes towards a greater comprehensive study Read full review

Contents

Image Explosion
1
Populations
24
Formats
55
Power
85
Notes
97
Credits
115
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

David Joselit is the Carnegie Professor of the History of Art at Yale University. His books include "American Art Since 1945" (Thames & Hudson) and "Feedback: Television against Democracy".

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