The New Century Speaker for School and College: A Collection of Extracts from the Speeches of Henry Cabot Lodge, Chauncey M. Depew, Charles H. Parkhurst, Henry W. Grady, James G. Blaine, James A. Garfield, Henry Ward Beecher, William H. Seward, Wendell Philips, George William Curtis, and Others : Selected and Adapted for Use in Declamation, and in the Study of American Oratory in the Latter Part of the Nineteenth Century (Google eBook)

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Ginn & Company, 1898 - Recitations - 346 pages
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Page 107 - I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is, But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him.
Page 312 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; * if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free, They touch our country, and their shackles, fall.
Page 57 - Turns the long light that droppeth down the wall, Turn the black flies that crawl along the ceiling, All are turning, all the day, and we with all. And all day the iron wheels are droning, And sometimes we could pray, " O ye wheels " (breaking out in a mad moaning), " Stop ! be silent for to-day ! "
Page 260 - He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat; He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment seat : Oh ! be swift, my soul, to answer Him ! be jubilant, my feet ! Our God is marching on. In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me : As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, While God is marching on.
Page 242 - As the end drew near, his early craving for the sea returned. The stately mansion of power had been to him the wearisome hospital of pain, and he begged to be taken from its prison walls, from its oppressive, stifling air, from its homelessness and its hopelessness.
Page 313 - I am in earnest. I will not equivocate I will not excuse I will not retreat a single inch. AND I WILL BE HEARD.
Page 236 - The new South is enamored of her new work. Her soul is stirred with the breath of a new life. The light of a grander day is falling fair on her face. She is thrilling with the consciousness of growing power and prosperity.
Page 235 - ... sacrifice what does he find when, having followed the battle-stained cross against overwhelming odds, dreading death not half so much as surrender, he reaches the home he left so prosperous and beautiful? He finds his house in ruins, his farm devastated, his slaves free, his stock killed, his...
Page 298 - Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne, Yet that scaffold sways the future, and, behind the dim unknown, Standeth God within the shadow, keeping watch above his own.
Page 241 - What blight and ruin met his anguished eyes, whose lips may tell what brilliant, broken plans, what baffled, high ambitions, what sundering of strong, warm, manhood's friendships, what bitter rending of sweet household ties! Behind him a proud, expectant nation, a great host of sustaining friends, a cherished and happy mother, wearing the full, rich honors of her early toil and tears ; the wife of his youth, whose whole life lay in his ; the little boys not yet emerged from childhood's...

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