Shelters, Shacks, and Shanties: The Classic Guide to Building Wilderness Shelters (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Courier Dover Publications, Jun 11, 2012 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 256 pages
2 Reviews
This excellent hands-on guide by one of the founders of the Boy Scouts of America contains a wealth of practical instruction and advice on how to build everything from a bark teepee and a tree-top house to a log cabin and a sod house. No professional architects are needed here; and knowing how to use an axe is more important than possessing carpentry skills.
More than 300 of the author's own illustrations and a clear, easy-to-follow text enable campers to create such lodgings as half-cave shelters, beaver mat huts, birch bark shacks, over-water camps, a Navajo hogan, and a pole house. Additional chapters provide information on how to use an axe, split and notch logs, make a fireplace, and even build appropriate gateways to log houses, game preserves, ranches, and other open areas.
An invaluable book for scouts, campers, hikers, and hunters of all ages, this guide and its fascinating collection of outdoor lore "still has intrinsic value," said Whole Earth Magazine, and will be of keen interest to any modern homesteader.
  

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Review: Shelters, Shacks & Shanties: And How to Build Them

User Review  - Mlt205 - Goodreads

I thought it was interesting how he mentions crowds and pollution and other problems of the cities repeatedly and we think of his time as the "good old days" before cities had these problems. Read full review

Review: Shelters, Shacks & Shanties: And How to Build Them

User Review  - Dav - Goodreads

Got it from the library and I'm going to buy my own copy of this. It is very well detailed and well illustrated reference on how to build pretty much every shelter humans have ever created, in the ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Daniel Beard was born in 1850 and lived most of his life in Kentucky. From an early age, Beard decided to devote his life to American boyhood. He was a prolific writer, illustrator, the founder of two different societies for boys and one of the original founding members of the Boy Scouts of America. Before his death in 1941, Beard received the only Golden Eagle badge ever awarded from the Boy Scouts of America, and had the mountain peak adjoining Mt. McKinley in Alaska named in his honor.

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