Songs, Comic and Satyrical (Google eBook)

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for Vernor and Hood, J. Cuthell, J. Walker, and Otridge and Son, 1801 - Ballads, English - 219 pages
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Page 16 - bove deck ; A leak beneath the chest-tree's sprung out, Call all hands to clear the wreck. Quick the lanyards cut to pieces : Come, my hearts, be stout and bold : Plumb the well — the leak increases, Four feet water in the hold...
Page 58 - ... and provoked a deal of mirth by his pleasantry. George Alexander Stevens be-rhymes the Fair in his day thus : — Here were, first of all, crowds against other crowds driving Like wind and tide meeting, each contrary striving ; Shrill fiddling, sharp fighting, and shouting and shrieking, Fifes, trumpets, drums, bagpipes, and barrow girls squeaking— " Come my rare round and sound, here's choice of fine ware !" Though all was not sound sold at Bartelmew Fair.
Page 106 - ... lips ; she has two, and her teeth they are white, And what she puts into her mouth they can bite ; Black and all black her eyes, but what's worthy remark, They are shut when she sleeps, and she's blind in the dark. Her ears from her cheeks equal distance are bearing, 'Cause each side her head should go partners in hearing ; The fall of her neck's the downfall of beholders, Love tumbles them in by the head and the shoulders. Her waist is— so — so, so waste no words about it, Her heart is within...
Page 42 - In a piece of slit hoop, see my candle is stuck, 'Twill light us each bottle to hand ; The foot of my glass for the purpose I broke, As I hate that a bumper should stand, My brave boys.
Page 45 - The fool who is wealthy is sure of a Bride]. Papilio the rich, in the hurry of love, Resolving to wed, to fair Arabell drove; He made his proposals, he begg'd she would fix, — What maid could say no to a new Coach-and-six ? We'll suppose they were wed, the guests bid, supper done, The fond pair in bed, and the stocking was thrown : The Bride lay expecting to what this wou'd tend, Since created a wife, wish'd to know for what end. On the velvet peach oft, as the gaudy fly rests, The Bridegroom's...
Page 47 - They sung, they laugh'd, they toy'd, they talk'd, Till night came darkling on. Love, wilful, needs would be their guide, And smiled at loss of day ; On her the kindred pair relied, And lost with her their way. Damp fell the dew, the wind blew cold, All bleak the barren moor ; Across they toil'd, when Love, grown bold, Knock'ํl loud at Labor's door.
Page 132 - ... storm being over, all sunshine the air, When instant rose up, the yet love-looking fair, Crying, hark ! there's one listens — do look out, dear, I must be bewitch'd, I am sure, to come here, My things how they are rumpled! — Lord! let me be gone ; What have you been doing? and what have I done ? Into this fatal place, I most solemnly vow, I innocent enter'd — but am I so now ? I'm ruin'd, — I never myself can forgive — I'll leap in the brook, — for I'm sure I can't live! — If I...
Page 48 - Enquiring for her brother TRUTH ; But TRUTH was never found! She sought in vain ; for LOVE was blind, And HATE her guidance crost. 'Tis said, since TRUTH she cannot find, That LOVE herself is lost!
Page 44 - On their stumps some have fought, and as stoutly will I, When reeling, I roll on the floor; Then my legs must be lost, so I'll drink as I lie, And dare the best buck to do more, My brave boys. 'Tis my will when I die, not a tear shall be shed, No Hie jacet be cut on my stone; But pour on my coffin a bottle of red, And say that his drinking is done, My brave boys!
Page 48 - A while within the reed-roofed cot They stood, and stared at CARE ; But long could not endure the spot, For POVERTY was there ! The twain proposed, next morn, to part, And travel different ways. Quoth LOVE, ' I soon shall find a heart ! ' WIT went to look for PRAISE. But REPUTATION, sighing, spoke ' 'Tis better we agree ! Though LOVE may laugh, and WIT may joke ; Yet, friends ! take care of me ! ' 'Without me, Beauty wins no heart! Without me, Wit is vain! If, headstrong, here with me you part ;...

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