Western women working in Japan: breaking corporate barriers

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Quorum Books, 1995 - Business & Economics - 225 pages
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Globalization demands that more employees become comfortable working outside their home country borders. Western Women Working in Japan is a research-based description of the work and living situations facing foreign professional women who work in Japan. The book draws upon detailed survey data and in-depth interviews, as well as the experiences of the authors, who have lived or worked in Japan during the last 20 years. It examines how foreign women can succeed in Japanese and foreign firms operating in Japan by describing what helps these Western women adjust to Japan and work with Japanese bosses, subordinates, and clients. These women face some different problems than men, yet are armed with special advantages. Drawing upon past research and exploring in new directions, the authors examine the connection between women's job success and the quality of their work relationships with the Japanese, their autonomy, Japanese linguistic ability, and age. Their working relationships are also compared to male expatriates and to the women's previous jobs. The interviews provide new insights into the sexual bias and harassment they encountered and how they dealt with these issues. The book includes valuable recommendations in the areas of selection, training, support, and repatriation for both the organizations that employ foreign women in their Japanese operations and for the women themselves.

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Contents

The Environment of Globalization
3
The Realities
23
The Adventurers
30
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1995)

NANCY K. NAPIER is Executive Director of the Global Business Consortium and Professor of International Business and Management at Boise State University.

SULLY TAYLOR is an Assistant Professor of International Management at the School of Business Administration, Portland State University, and has taught in Spain and Japan.

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