Radiation Detection and Measurement

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Aug 16, 2010 - Technology & Engineering - 860 pages
3 Reviews
This is the resource that engineers turn to in the study of radiation detection. The fourth edition takes into account the technical developments that continue to enhance the instruments and techniques available for the detection and spectroscopy of ionizing radiation. New coverage is presented on ROC curves, micropattern gas detectors, new sensors for scintillation light, and the excess noise factor. Revised discussions are also included on TLDs and cryogenic spectrometers, radiation backgrounds, and the VME standard. Engineers will gain a strong understanding of the field with this updated book.
  

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This is a very nice book in experimental nuclear physics.

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Brilliant, comprehensive and easy to read. Not a lot more needed.
Essential text for radiation safety, health physics and medical physics.

Contents

Radiation Sources 1
1
Units and Definitions 2
2
Fast Electron Sources 3
3
1 Some Pure BetaMinus Sources 4
4
Heavy Charged Particle Sources 6
6
Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation 10
10
4 Some Radioisotope Sources of LowEnergy XRays 16
16
Neutron Sources 19
19
Ancillary Equipment Required with Photomultiplier Tubes
294
Photodiodes as Substitutes for Photomultiplier Tubes
297
Scintillation Pulse Shape Analysis
308
Hybrid Photomultiplier Tubes
312
PositionSensing Photomultiplier Tubes
315
Photoionization Detectors
317
Radiation Spectroscopy with Scintillators
321
GammaRay Interactions
322

1
22
7 Alternativea n Isotopic Neutron Sources 23
23
Radiation Interactions
29
Interaction of Heavy Charged Particles
30
Interaction of Fast Electrons
42
Interaction of Gamma Rays
47
Interaction of Neutrons
53
Radiation Exposure and Dose
56
1 Exposure Rate Constant for Some Common Radioisotope GammaRay Sources
57
Counting Statistics and Error Prediction
65
Characterization of Data
66
Statistical Models
70
4 Probability of Occurrence of Given Deviations Predicted by the Gaussian
78
Applications of Statistical Models
79
6 Examples of Error Intervals for a Single Measurement x 100
84
Error Propagation
85
Optimization of Counting Experiments
92
Limits of Detectability
94
Distribution of Time Intervals
99
General Properties of Radiation Detectors
105
Modes of Detector Operation
106
Pulse Height Spectra
112
Counting Curves and Plateaus
113
Energy Resolution
115
Detection Efficiency
118
Dead Time
121
Ionization Chambers
131
1 Values of the Energy Dissipation per Ion Pair the WValue for Different Gases
132
Charge Migration and Collection
135
Design and Operation of DC Ion Chambers
138
Radiation Dose Measurement with Ion Chambers
142
2 Thicknesses of Ionization Chamber Walls Required for Establishment of Electronic
144
Applications of DC Ion Chambers
146
Pulse Mode Operation
149
Proportional Counters
159
Design Features of Proportional Counters
164
Proportional Counter Performance
169
1 Diethorn Parameters for Proportional Gases
172
3 Gain Pulse Height Variations in a Proportional Counter
178
Detection Efficiency and Counting Curves
184
Variants of the Proportional Counter Design
189
4 Spectral Properties of Light Emitted in Gas Proportional Scintillation Counters
194
Micropattern Gas Detectors
195
GeigerMueller Counters
207
The Geiger Discharge
208
Fill Gases
210
Time Behavior
212
The Geiger Counting Plateau
214
Design Features
216
Counting Efficiency
217
TimetoFirstCount Method
219
GM Survey Meters
220
Scintillation Detector Principles
223
Organic Scintillators
224
1 Properties of Some Commercially Available Organic Scintillators
230
Inorganic Scintillators
235
3 Properties of Common Inorganic Scintillators
238
4 Properties of Gas Scintillators at Atmospheric Pressure
256
Light Collection And Scintillator Mounting
258
5 Typical Light Yield for Fiber Scintillators
267
Photomultiplier Tubes and Photodiodes
275
The Photocathode
276
Electron Multiplication
280
Photomultiplier Tube Characteristics
283
1 Properties of Some Commercially Available Photomultiplier Tubes
289
Predicted Response Functions
326
Properties of Scintillation GammaRay Spectrometers
338
Response of Scintillation Detectors to Neutrons
355
Electron Spectroscopy with Scintillators
356
Specialized Detector Configurations Based on Scintillation
357
1
364
Semiconductor Diode Detectors
365
1 Properties of Intrinsic Silicon and Germanium
368
2 Parameters of the 252Cf Fission Fragment Spectrum
406
1
408
Germanium GammaRay Detectors
415
Table A 1
451
Other SolidState Detectors
467
Photon Intensities per Disintegration of 241Am
478
Properties of Semiconductor Materials
492
Some Alternative Compound Semiconductor Materials
499
Comparison of Electrical and Charge Transport Properties of DirectConversion
513
Slow Neutron Detection Methods
519
Properties of Emitter Materials for SPN Detectors Based on Beta Decay
547
Fast Neutron Detection and Spectroscopy
553
Properties of Some Commercially Available Lithium Glass Scintillators
564
Maximum Fractional Energy Transfer in Neutron Elastic Scattering
571
Pulse Processing
595
Properties of Coaxial Cables
600
Summary of Common PulseProcessing Functions
611
Pulse Shaping Counting and Timing
625
Contents
643
Pulse Height Analysis Systems
647
Digital Pulse Processing
668
Some Examples of Fast AnalogtoDigital Converters
674
Systems Involving Pulse Timing
680
Pulse Shape Discrimination
700
Multichannel Pulse Analysis
705
General Multichannel Characteristics
707
The Multichannel Analyzer
711
Spectrum Stabilization and Relocation
721
Spectrum Analysis
724
Miscellaneous Detector Types
733
GasFilled Detectors in SelfQuenched Streamer Mode
735
HighPressure Xenon Spectrometers
738
Liquid Ionization and Proportional Counters
739
Cryogenic Detectors
741
Photographic Emulsions
748
Thermoluminescent Dosimeters and Image Plates
751
TrackEtch Detectors
759
Commonly Used TrackEtch Materials
761
Superheated Drop or Bubble Detectors
764
Neutron Detection by Activation
767
Materials Useful as Slow Neutron Activation Detectors
770
Detection Methods Based on Integrated Circuit Components
774
Background and Detector Shielding
779
Levels of Activities from Natural Sources in Common Construction Materials
782
Background in GammaRay Spectra
784
Background in Other Detectors
789
Alpha Particle Emission Rates from Various Materials
790
Shielding Materials
791
Active Methods of Background Reduction
795
Appendix A The NIM CAMAC and VME Instrumentation Standards
801
NIM Standard Logic Levels
802
Appendix B Derivation of the Expression for Sample Variance in Chapter 3
807
Statistical Behavior of Counting Data for Variable Mean Value
809
The ShockleyRamo Theorem for Induced Charge
813
Index
819
xxvi
825
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