Illustrations of the literary history of the eighteenth century: Consisting of authentic memoirs and original letters of eminent persons; and intended as a sequel to the Literary anecdotes, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Printed for the author, by Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1817 - Eighteenth century
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Page 198 - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
Page 726 - How, with less reading than makes felons scape, Less human genius than God gives an ape, Small thanks to France, and none to Rome or Greece, A past, vamp'd, future, old, reviv'd, new piece, 'Twixt Plautus, Fletcher, Shakespear, and Corneille, Can make a Gibber, Tibbald, or Ozell.
Page 749 - ... for half a year or more, the common newspapers (in most of which they had some property, as being hired writers) were filled with the most abusive falsehoods and scurrilities they could possibly devise...
Page 693 - Ah little think the gay licentious proud, Whom pleasure, power, and affluence surround; They, who their thoughtless hours in giddy mirth, And wanton, often cruel, riot waste; Ah little think they, while they dance along, How many feel, this very moment, death And all the sad variety of pain.
Page 717 - Now May'rs and Shrieves all hush'd and satiate lay, Yet eat, in dreams, the custard of the day; While pensive Poets painful vigils keep, Sleepless themselves, to give their readers sleep.
Page 73 - Homer himself drew not his art so immediately from the fountains of nature, it proceeded through ^Egyptian strainers and channels and came to him not without some tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models, of those before him.
Page 195 - Duncan is in his grave ; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well ; Treason has done his worst : nor steel, nor poison. Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing, Can touch him further.
Page 587 - Caora are a nation of people, whose heads appear not above their shoulders ; which, though it may be thought a mere fable, yet for mine own part I am resolved it is true, because every child in the provinces of Arromaia and Canuri affirm the same : they are called Ewaipanoma : they are reported to have their eyes in their shoulders, and their mouths in the middle of their breasts, and that a long train of hair groweth backward between their shoulders.
Page 348 - Above their functions and their offices. It adds a precious seeing to the eye ; A lover's eyes will gaze an eagle blind ; A lover's ear will hear the lowest sound, When the suspicious head of theft is stopp'd; Love's feeling is more soft, and sensible, Than are the tender horns of cockled snails...
Page 404 - Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty : let us be Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon : And let men say, we be men of good government; being governed as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal.

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