Architectural engineering: with especial reference to high building construction, including many examples of prominent office buildings (Google eBook)

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John Wiley, 1906 - Building, Iron and steel - 407 pages
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Page 159 - ... shall be similarly covered in with brickwork not less than four inches in thickness on the outer surfaces and tied and bonded, but the extreme outer edge of the flanges of beams, or plates or angles connected to the beams, may project to within two inches of the outside surface of the brick casing. The inside surfaces of girders may be similarly covered with brickwork, or if projecting inside of the wall, they shall be protected by terra-cotta, concrete or other fireproof material.
Page 280 - All structures exposed to wind shall be designed to resist a horizontal wind pressure of thirty pounds for every square foot of surface thus exposed, from the ground to the top of same, including roof, in any direction. In no case shall the overturning moment due to wind pressure exceed seventy-five per centum of the moment of stability of the structure. In all structures exposed to wind, if the resisting moments of the ordinary materials of construction, such as masonry, partitions...
Page 285 - Where no test of the sustaining power of the soil is made, different soils, excluding mud, at the bottom of the footings, shall be deemed to safely sustain the following loads to the superficial foot, namely: Soft clay...
Page 110 - Or between the said beams may be placed solid or hollow burnt clay, stone, brick, or concrete slabs in flat or curved shapes, concrete or other fireproof composition, and any of said materials may be used in combination with wire cloth, expanded metal, wire strands, or wrought iron or steel bars...
Page 164 - Ashlar. Stone used for the facing of any building, and known as ashlar, shall be not less than four inches thick. Stone ashlar shall be anchored to the backing and the backing shall be of such thickness as to make the walls, independent of the ashlar, conform as to the thickness with the requirements of sections...
Page 193 - ... be taken twice as great for mild-steel columns as for cast-iron; indeed, this may be put as a reasonably accurate statement. The series of tests of cast-iron columns represented in the Plate constitute a revelation of a not very assuring character in reference to cast-iron columns now standing, and which may be loaded approximately up to specification amounts. They further show that if cast-iron columns are designed with anything like a reasonable and real margin of safety the amount of metal...
Page 285 - If the soil is a layer of pure clay at least fifteen feet thick without admixture of any foreign substance excepting gravel, it shall not be loaded more than at the rate of 3,500 pounds per square foot.
Page 159 - The exposed sides of the iron or steel girders shall be similarly covered in with brickwork not less than four inches in thickness on the outer surfaces and tied and bonded, but the extreme outer edge of the flanges of beams, or plates or angles connected to the beams, may project to within two inches of the outside surface of the brick casing.
Page 293 - Whenever an excavation of either earth or rock for building or other purposes shall be intended to be, or shall be carried to, the depth of more than 10 feet below the curb, the person or persons causing such excavation to be made shall at all times, from the commencement until the completion thereof, if afforded the necessary license to enter upon the adjoining land and not otherwise, at his or their own expense, preserve any adjoining or contiguous...
Page 294 - ... afforded the necessary license to enter upon the adjoining land, and not otherwise, at his or their own expense, preserve any adjoining or contiguous wall or walls, structure or structures, from injury, and support the same by proper foundations, so that the said wall or walls, structure or structures shall be and remain practically as safe as before such excavation was commenced, whether said adjoining or contiguous wall or walls, structure or structures, are down more or less than ten feet...

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