Manual of Zen Buddhism (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Grove Press, Dec 1, 2007 - Religion - 192 pages
4 Reviews
Here are the famous sutras, or sermons, of the Buddha; the gathas, or hymns; the intriguing philosophical puzzles known as koan; and the dharanis, or invocations to expel evil spirits. Included also are the recorded conversations of the great Buddhist monks -- intimate dialogues on subjects of momentous importance. In addition to the written selections, all of them translated by Dr. Suzuki, there are reproductions of many Buddhist drawings and paintings, including religious statues found in Zen temples, each with an explanation of its significance, and the great series of allegorical paintings "The Ten Oxherding Pictures."
  

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Review: Manual of Zen Buddhism

User Review  - Jason - Goodreads

A great reference book for important Zen writings. Read full review

Review: Manual of Zen Buddhism

User Review  - Joe Green - Goodreads

I felt this book started off rather slowly with the Indian Sutras and whatnot. They were a little to imaginative and difficult for me to digest. However, once it got into the Ch'an masters, it became ... Read full review

Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
EDITORS NOTE
PREFACE TO FIRST EDITION
I GATHAS AND PRAYERS
II THE DHARANIS
III THE SUTRAS
IV FROM THE CHINESE ZENMASTERS
V FROM THE JAPANESE ZEN MASTERS
15
VI THE BUDDHIST STATUES AND PICTURES IN A ZEN MONASTERY
17
Index
17
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki was Japan's foremost authority on Zen Buddhism, and the author of over 100 works on the subject. He was trained as a Buddhist disciple in the great Zen monastery at Kamakura. From 1897 to 1908 he worked in the United States as an editor and translator, and later became a lecturer at Tokyo Imperial University. In 1950, at 80, he returned to the United States and spent most of the decade teaching, lecturing, and writing, particularly at Columbia and Harvard. Returning to Japan, he died in Tokyo in 1966 at the age of 95.
Christopher Reed has been teaching Buddhism and Buddhist meditation for 15 years. He received transmission as a Dharma teacher from Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh. He has been influenced by the tradition of socially/politically engaged Buddhism, and works toward the integration of traditional Buddhist teaching with the demands of everyday life. He is co-founder and director of the Ordinary Dharma Meditation Center in Los Angeles and the Manzanita Village Retreat Center in San Diego.

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