Diplomacy with a Difference: The Commonwealth Office of High Commissioner, 1880-2006

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Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2007 - Political Science - 353 pages
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This book illuminates two familiar phenomena - diplomacy and the Commonwealth - from a new and unfamiliar angle: the atypical way in which the Commonwealth's members came to, and continue to, engage in official relations with each other. This innovative and wide-ranging study is based on archival material from four states, interviews and correspondence with diplomats, and a wide range of secondary sources. It shows how members of an empire found it necessary to engage in diplomacy and, in so doing, created a singular, and often remarkably intimate, diplomatic system. The result is a fascinating, multidisciplinary exploration of the evolving Commonwealth and the way in which its 53 members and Ireland conduct diplomacy with one another, and in so doing have contributed a distinctive terminology to the diplomatic lexicon.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter One Beginnings 18801914
13
Chapter Two Consolidation 1914late 1930s
25
Chapter Three Discontent late 1930smid1940s
63
Chapter Four Equal Status 19461948
97
Chapter Five Substantive Equality late 1940searly 1950s
127
Chapter Six Ambassadors plus early 1950smid1960s
169
Chapter Seven Normalisation early 1960smid1970s
207
Appendix One Glossary
291
Appendix Two Commonwealth Members
297
Appendix Three The Growth of IntraCommonwealth Representation 18801957
301
Appendix Four Relevant Articles from the Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic Relations 1961 and on Consular Relations 1963
305
Appendix Five High CommissionerA Historical Note
317
Bibliography
321
Index of Names
333
Index of Subjects
345

Chapter Eight Survival mid1970s2006
267

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Lorna Lloyd was educated at the London School of Economics and teaches International Relations at Keele University. She has written Peace through Law. Britain and the International Court in the 1920s (The Boydell Press for the Royal Historical Society, 1997), and is a co-author of International Organisation in World Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 3rd edition, 2004).

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