An Inquiry Into the Genuineness of the Manuscript Corrections in Mr. J. Payne Collier's Annotated Shakspere, Folio, 1632: And of Certain Shaksperian Documents Likewise Published by Mr. Collier. By N. E. S. A. Hamilton (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Richard Bentley, 1860 - Literary forgeries and mystifications - 155 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ii - twere anew, the gaps of centuries ; Leaving that beautiful which still was so, And making that which was not, till the place Became religion, and the heart ran o'er With silent worship of the great of old ! The dead, but sceptred sovereigns, who still rule Our spirits from their urns.
Page 13 - ... original binding. Still, Thomas Perkins might have been a descendant of Richard ; and this circumstance and others induced me to examine the volume more particularly: I then discovered, to my surprise, that there was hardly a page which did not present, in a handwriting of the time, some emendations in the pointing or in the text, while on most of them they were frequent, and on many numerous.
Page 132 - I have," says he in his preface to this last work (p. Ixxix) , " often gone over the thousands of marks of all kinds in its margins; but I will take this opportunity of pointing out two emendations of considerable importance, which, happening not to be in the margins, and being written with very pale ink, escaped my eye until some time after the appearance of my second edition, as well as of the one-volume Shakspeare.
Page 29 - A pencil tick crossed the u, intersecting each limb of that letter. The pencil was barely visible through the first stroke, and not at all visible under the second stroke of the u. On damping off the ink in the first stroke, however, the pencil-mark became much plainer than before, and even when as much of the inkstain as possible was removed, the pencil still runs through the ink line in unbroken even continuity.
Page 100 - Nicholas Tooley. This remarkable paper has, perhaps, never seen the light from the moment it was presented, until it was very recently discovered. It is seven years anterior to the date of any other authentic record, which contains the name of our great dramatist...
Page 119 - To the last quoted document, but in a different hand and in different ink, is appended a list of the King's players. The name of Shakespeare there occurs second ; and as it could not be written at the bottom of the letter of the Council to the Lord Mayor, &c. prior to the date of that letter, it proves that up to 9th April, 1604, our great dramatist continued to be numbered among the actors of the company. Hitherto the last trace we have had of Shakespeare as actually on the stage, has been as one...
Page 93 - Chaloner, who would have borrowed x" to have bought things for and said he was known unto you, and Mr. Shakespeare of the Globe, who came .... said he knewe hym not, onely he herde of hym that he was a roge so he was glade we did not lend him the monney Richard Johnes [went] to seeke and inquire after the fellow, and said he had lent hym a horse.
Page 83 - Sr. Jon Falsstaff: in a roabe of russet, quite low, with a great belley, like a swolen man, long moustacheos, the sheows [shoes] shorte, and out of them great toes like naked feete : buskins to sheaw a great swolen leg.
Page 152 - I therefore showed it to him on the spot, and after looking at it in several places, he gave it back to me with these words : ' That was my book : it is the same, but it has been much ill-used since it was in my possession.
Page 119 - Malone also appears to have reserved another circumtance, of very considerable importance in relation to Shakespeare, for his life of the poet. To the last-quoted document, but in a different hand and in different ink, is appended a list of the king's players. The name of Shakespeare there occurs second, and as it could not be written at the bottom of the letter of the Council to the Lord Mayor, &c. prior to the date of that letter, it proves that up to 9th April, 1604, our great dramatist continued...

Bibliographic information