Printing Types: Their History, Forms, and Use; a Study in Survivals, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Harvard University Press, 1922 - Printing
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Page 148 - Sweet smiling village, loveliest of the lawn, Thy sports are fled, and all thy charms withdrawn ; Amidst thy bowers the tyrant's hand is seen, And desolation saddens all thy green : One only master grasps the whole domain, And half a tillage stints thy smiling plain...
Page 205 - Nov. n, 1895, he says:"I began printing books with the hope of producing some which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time they should be easy to read and should not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters. I have always been a great admirer of the calligraphy of Middle Ages, and of the earlier printing which took its place. As to the fifteenth...
Page 196 - Catilina, patientia nostra ? quamdiu etiam furor iste tuus [nos] eludet ? quem ad finem sese effrenata jactabit audacia ? nihilne te nocturnum praesidium Palatii, nihil urbis vigiliae, nihil timor populi, nihil concursus bonorum omnium, nihil hic munitissimus habendi senatus locus, nihil horum ora vultusque moverunt...
Page 109 - Amongst the several mechanic Arts that have engaged my attention, there is no one which I have pursued with so much steadiness and pleasure, as that of Letter-Founding. Having been an early admirer of the beauty of Letters, I became insensibly desirous of contributing to the perfection of them.
Page 200 - THOU, whose sweet youth and early hopes inhance Thy rate and price, and mark thee for a treasure, Hearken unto a Verser, who may chance Ryme thee to good, and make a bait of pleasure : A verse may finde him who a sermon flies, And turn delight into a sacrifice.
Page 148 - Autographs, etc., Illustrative of the History and Progress of Printing and Bookselling in England, 1477-1800. Held at Stationers' Hall, June, 1912, by the International Association of Antiquarian Booksellers.
Page 146 - Press, are particularly meant to combine the various beauties of PRINTING, TYPE-FOUNDING, ENGRAVING, and PAPER-MAKING ; as well with a view to ascertain the near approach to perfection which those arts have attained in this country, as to invite a fair competition with the best Typographical Productions of other nations.
Page 132 - But alas ! this family did in the late rebellion suffer extremely in their estates ; and the heirs of that castle saw it laid level with that earth that was too good to bury those wretches that were the cause of it.
Page 205 - I wanted was letter pure in form; severe, without needless excrescences; solid, without the thickening and thinning of the line, which is the essential fault of the ordinary modern type, and which makes it difficult to read ; and not compressed laterally, as all later type has grown to be owing to commercial exigencies.
Page 275 - It will remain a voice crying in the wilderness; but it will believe what it cries, and there will be some to listen to it in the future, as there have been many in the past. As to modernism, it is suicide. It is the last of those concessions to the spirit of the world which half-believers and doubleminded prophets have always been found making; but it is a mortal concession. It concedes everything; for it concedes that everything in Christianity, as Christians...

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