The Economics of Discrimination (Google eBook)

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University of Chicago Press, Aug 15, 2010 - Business & Economics - 178 pages
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This second edition of Gary S. Becker's The Economics of Discrimination has been expanded to include three further discussions of the problem and an entirely new introduction which considers the contributions made by others in recent years and some of the more important problems remaining.

Mr. Becker's work confronts the economic effects of discrimination in the market place because of race, religion, sex, color, social class, personality, or other non-pecuniary considerations. He demonstrates that discrimination in the market place by any group reduces their own real incomes as well as those of the minority.

The original edition of The Economics of Discrimination was warmly received by economists, sociologists, and psychologists alike for focusing the discerning eye of economic analysis upon a vital social problem—discrimination in the market place.

"This is an unusual book; not only is it filled with ingenious theorizing but the implications of the theory are boldly confronted with facts. . . . The intimate relation of the theory and observation has resulted in a book of great vitality on a subject whose interest and importance are obvious."—M.W. Reder, American Economic Review

"The author's solution to the problem of measuring the motive behind actual discrimination is something of a tour de force. . . . Sociologists in the field of race relations will wish to read this book."—Karl Schuessler, American Sociological Review
  

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Contents

2 EFFECTIVE DISCRIMINATION
19
3 EMPLOYER DISCRIMINATION
39
4 EMPLOYEE DISCRIMINATION
55
5 CONSUMER AND GOVERNMENT DISCRIMINATION
75
6 MARKET DISCRIMINATION
84
7 DISCRIMINATION AGAINST NONWHITES I
101
8 DISCRIMINATION AGAINST NONWHITES II
110
9 CHANGES IN DISCRIMINATION OVER TIME
135
10 SUMMARY
153
INDEX
163
Copyright

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Page 14 - taste for discrimination,' he must act as //he were willing to pay something either directly or in the form of a reduced income, to be associated with some persons instead of others. When actual discrimination occurs, he must, in fact, either pay or forfeit income for this privilege. This simple way of looking at the matter gets at the essence of prejudice and discrimination...
Page 13 - For example, discrimination and prejudice are not usually said to occur when someone prefers looking at a glamorous Hollywood actress rather than at some other woman; yet they are said to occur when he prefers living next to whites rather than next to Negroes. At best calling just one of these actions "discrimination" requires making subtle and rather secondary distinctions.
Page 13 - Ethnic prejudice is an antipathy based upon a faulty and inflexible generalization. It may be felt or expressed. It may be directed toward a group as a whole, or toward an individual because he is a member of that group.
Page 21 - Saenger, a psychologist, said: "Discriminatory practices appear to be of definite advantage for the representatives of management in a competitive economic system" (The Social Psychology of Prejudice [New York: Harper & Bros., 1953], p. 96). Allport, another psychologist, likewise said: "We conclude, therefore, that the Marxist theory of prejudice is far too simple, even though it points a sure finger at one of the factors involved in prejudice, viz., rationalized selfinterest of the upper classes"...
Page 21 - A' are reduced by discrimination, all factors are not affected in the same way: the return to W capital and N labor decreases, but the return to W labor and N capital actually increases. There is a remarkable agreement in the literature on the proposition that capitalists from the dominant group are the major beneficiaries of prejudice and discrimination in a competitive capitalistic economic system.4 If W is considered to represent whites or some other dominant group, the fallacious nature of this...

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About the author (2010)

Becker won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1992. He is Professor of Economics and Sociology at the University of Chicago.

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