Crumbling Idols: Twelve Essays on Art, Dealing Chiefly with Literature, Painting and the Drama (Google eBook)

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Stone and Kimball, 1894 - American literature - 192 pages
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Page 110 - But there is another method the method of the life we all lead. Here nothing can be prophesied. There is a strange coming and going of feet. Men appear, act and react upon each other, and pass away. When the crisis comes, the man who would fit it does not return. When the curtain falls, no one is ready. When the footlights are brightest, they are blown out; and what the name of the play is no one knows.
Page 190 - Rise, O young man and woman of America ! Stand erect ! Face the future with a song on your lips and the light of a broader day in your eyes. Turn your back on the past, not in scorn, but in justice to the future. Cease trying to be correct, and become creative. This is our day. The past is not vital. It is a highway of dust, and Homer, jEschylus, Sophocles, Dante, Shakespeare are milestones.
Page 52 - The realist or veritist is really an optimist, a dreamer. He sees life in terms of what it might be, as well as in terms of what it is...
Page 110 - Human life may be painted according to two methods. There is the stage method. According to that each character is duly marshalled at first, and ticketed; we know with an immutable certainty that at the right crises each one will reappear and act his part, and, when the curtain falls, all will stand before it bowing. There is a sense of satisfaction in this, and of completeness. But there is another method - the method of the life we all lead.
Page 64 - Local color in a novel means that it has such quality of texture and back-ground that it could not have been written in any other place or by any one else than a native.
Page 69 - Local Novel The local novel seems to be the heir-apparent to the kingdom of poesy. It is already the most promising of all literary attempts to-day; certainly it is the most sincere. It seems but beginning its work. It is "hopelessly contemporaneous"; that 20 is its strength.
Page 35 - Write of those things of which you know most, and for which you care most. By so doing you will be true to yourself, true to your locality, and true to your time.
Page 50 - Literalism, the book that can be quoted in bits, is like a picture that can be cut into pieces. It lacks unity. The higher art would seem to be the art that perceives and states the relations of things, giving atmosphere and relative values as they appeal to the sight.
Page 115 - They re-act upon men, they rise above men at times in the perception of justice, of absolute ethics; they are out in the world, the men's world. They may not understand it very well, but they are at least in it, and having their opinion upon things, and voicing their emotions. They are out of the unhealthy air of the feudalistic romance, so much is certain, so much is gain. They are grappling, not merely with affairs, but with social problems.10 Rose is decidedly "in the men's world," but often without...
Page 110 - There is a sense of satisfaction in this and of completeness. But there is another method the method of the life we all lead. Here nothing can be prophesied. There is a strange coming and going of feet. Men appear, act and react upon each other, and pass away. When the crisis comes, the man who would fit it does not return. When the curtain...

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