A History of California: The Spanish Period (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1921 - California - 527 pages
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Page 430 - Forty years on wall and bastion swept the hollow idle breeze, Since the Russian eagle fluttered from the California seas. Forty years on wall and bastion wrought its slow but sure decay ; And St. George's cross was lifted in the port of Monterey. And the citadel was lighted, and the hall was gayly drest, All to honor Sir George Simpson, famous traveller and guest.
Page 502 - Under the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo between the United States and Mexico, which...
Page 91 - America may be call'd the longest, and most dreadful of any in the world ; as well because of the vast ocean to be cross'd, being almost the one half of the terraqueous globe, with the wind always a-head; as for the terrible tempests that happen there, one upon the back of another, and for the desperate diseases that seize people, in...
Page 105 - ... from their cheekes in a monstrous manner, the blood streaming downe along their brests, besides despoiling the vpper parts of their bodies of those single couerings they formerly had, and holding their hands aboue their heads that they might not rescue their brests from harme, they would with furie cast themselues vpon the .ground, neuer respecting whether it were cleane or soft, but dashed themselues in this manner on hard stones, knobby hillocks, stocks of wood, and pricking bushes, or whateuer...
Page 422 - The climate is so good that all are getting to look like Englishmen. This is the most peaceful and quiet country in the world; one lives better here than in the...
Page 106 - Generall, dispersed themselues among our people, taking a diligent view or suruey of euery man ; and finding such as pleased their fancies (which commonly were the youngest of vs), they presently enclosing them about offred their sacrifices vnto them, crying out with lamentable shreekes and moanes, weeping and scratching and tearing their very flesh off their faces with their nailes ; neither were it the women alone which did this, but euen old men, roaring and crying out, were as violent as the...
Page 134 - ... we found ourselves to be in the best port that could be desired, for besides being sheltered from all the winds, it has many pines for masts and yards, and live oaks and white oaks, and water in great quantity, all near the shore.
Page 93 - Armenian manner, having banish'd from his table all wine, oil and vinegar; dressing his fish with fair water and salt. Upon flesh days he gave me Tassajos Fritos, that is, steaks of beef or buffalo, dry'd in the sun or wind, which are so hard that it is impossible to eat them, without they are first well beaten...
Page 93 - At last he depriv'd me of the satisfaction of gnawing a good bisket, because he would spend no more of his own, but laid the king's allowance on the table; in every mouthful whereof there went down abundance of maggots and Gorgojos chew'd and bruis'd. On fish days the common diet was old rank fish boil'd in fair water and salt; at noon we had Mongos...
Page 42 - So long as the sun shall warm the earth, let no Christian be so bold as to come to Japan ; and let all know, that the King of Spain himself, or the Christians' God, or the great God of all, if he violate this command, shall pay for it with his head.

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