Acts of Discovery: Visions of America in the Lewis and Clark Journals

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University of Illinois Press, 1993 - History - 276 pages
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"Furtwangler also attempts to define Lewis and Clark's place in American history. He examines some ironic outcomes of westward expansion and conquest and brings out the peculiar courage of explorers who were the first (and almost the last) to cross the continent by pulling their way up the Missouri. He also compares Lewis and Clark's discoveries to those of other generations (from George Washington's early years as a surveyor of the new American interior, to the Apollo moon landings), discussing them in light of questions about progress posed by Francis Bacon, Henry Adams, and modern experimental scientists."--BOOK JACKET.
  

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Contents

Discovery and Serendipity
1
The American Sublime
23
Confronting the Bear
52
Extending George Washingtons Errand
70
Ingesting America
91
Signals of Friendship
110
Reading the Birds
135
Finding Words
154
The Rhythms of Rivers
171
Themes for a Wilderness Epic
192
Ghosts on the Trail
208
The Rockies by Moonlight
228
Notes
247
Index
269
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Furtwangler is professor emeritus of English at Mt. Allison University, Sackville, Canada.

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