Feeding London: A Taste of History

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Historical Publications, 2003 - Cooking - 208 pages
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London has had a voracious appetite since Roman times. It has spawned markets, encouraged market--gardeners and given a livelihood to restaurants and cafes by the million. Coffee, tea and chocolate brought their own drinking outlets, as did chops and fish and chips. Social divisions were emphasised by diet. While the better off relished roast and vegetables, the poor in the workhouses were condemned to a monotonous and sparse regime. Servants gladly ate the leftovers of multi-course dinners upstairs. The story ranges from cook shops to the Ritz, from palaces to prisons. Richard Tames takes us through an informed and entertaining history of how Londoners have eaten and were supplied. He includes household names and little known happenings in a fascinating and well illustrated book.

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Contents

Introduction
6
Part Two Theory and Practice
50
Part Three Supply and Demand
73
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Richard Tames lectures on London's history for the Institute of Tourist Guiding, which trains the city's prestigious Blue Badge guides. He is the author of twenty books on London, where he lives.

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