A HISTORY OF THE CITY OF BROOKLY. (Google eBook)

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Contents

I
9
II
48
III
105
IV
127
V
152
VI
166
VII
197
VIII
221
IX
242
X
297
XI
331
XII
377
XIII
396

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Page 38 - The traders whom your first ships left on our shore, to traffic till their return, were cherished by us as the apple of our eye : we gave them our daughters for their wives ; among those whom you have murdered were children of your own blood.
Page 291 - The militia, instead of calling forth their utmost efforts to a brave and manly opposition in order to repair our losses, are dismayed, intractable, and impatient to return. "Great numbers of them have gone off; in some instances, almost by whole regiments, by half ones, and by companies at a time.
Page 259 - ... hirelings and mercenaries. Be cool, but determined, do not fire at a distance, but wait for orders from your officers.
Page 274 - The Hessians and our brave Highlanders gave no quarter, and it was a fine sight to see with what alacrity they dispatched the rebels with their bayonets after we had surrounded them, so that they could not resist.
Page 333 - I shudder to think of the murders I have been accessory to, both with and •without orders from government, especially while in New York, during which time there were more than two thousand prisoners starved in the different churches by stopping the rations, which I sold.
Page 346 - While so many were sick with raging fever there was a loud cry for water, but none could be had except on the upper deck, and but one allowed to ascend at a time. The suffering then from the rage of thirst during the night was very great. Nor was it at all times safe to attempt to go up. Provoked by the continual cry for leave to ascend, when there was already one on deck, the sentry would push them back with his bayonet. By one of these thrusts, which was more spiteful and violent than common, I...
Page 227 - After supper, we went to sleep in the barn, upon some straw spread with sheep-skins, in the midst of the continual grunting of hogs, squealing of pigs, bleating and coughing of sheep, barking of dogs, crowing of cocks, cackling of hens, and, especially, a goodly quantity of fleas and vermin...
Page 334 - On a Sunday afternoon, about the middle of October, 1777, one of the prison ships was burnt ; the prisoners, except a few, who, it was said, were burnt in the vessel, were removed to the remaining ship. It was reported at the time that the prisoners had fired their prison ; which, if true, proves that they preferred death, even by fire, to the lingering sufferings of pestilence and starvation. In the month of February, 1778, the remaining prison ship was burnt at night, when the prisoners were removed...
Page 350 - After the hospital ships were brought into the Wallabout, it was reported that the sick were attended by physicians ; few, very few, however, recovered. It was no uncommon thing to see five or six dead bodies brought on shore in a single morning...
Page 405 - Keep at proper distance, Else we'll make you stare At our firm resistance ; Let alone the lads Who are freedom tasting, .Recollect our dads Gave you once a basting. Pickaxe, shovel, spade, Crowbar, hoe, and barrow, Better not invade, Yankees have the marrow.

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