Alex Haley's Queen: the story of an American family

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W. Morrow, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 670 pages
21 Reviews
Once in every generation, there is a landmark book that adds a new richness to all our lives. For millions of people of all colors, that book was Alex Haley's Roots. Roots was an instant success, winning a Pulitzer Prize and spawning the most-watched miniseries in television history. Alex Haley's legacy has had as great an impact on American families as any story in the twentieth century. Now, from the author of Roots, comes Alex Haley's Queen - the saga of his father's family. Lovers of sweeping generational epics will find much to rejoice in here. Once again, this is a personal saga, but one played out against the broad canvas of American history. The story begins in Ireland, where Haley's white great-great-grandfather, James Jackson, Sr., is born. From there we travel with Jackson to Nashville, where he meets Andrew Jackson, the future president of the United States. The two men become business partners, and James Jackson makes his fortune. He establishes his grand plantation, The Forks of Cypress, in Alabama, while Andrew ascends to the White House, and the rumblings that will explode into the Civil War gather force. James's son Jass Jackson inherits the plantation just as the genteel, well-ordered antebellum world begins to crumble. His adolescent attraction to the beautiful and strongwilled slave named Easter blossoms into a powerful and lasting love, and from their passionate union comes Queen - the heroine of the tale, Alex Haley's grandmother. This is history at its most compelling - from the Irish sod to the settlement of the South; from the Trail of Tears to the battlefield at Manassas; from the agonies of slavery to the tribulations of freedom - all rendered with the eye fortelling detail and the sense of historical significance that readers have come to expect of Haley. In this, his final book, Alex Haley has created a truly multicultural family saga, the capstone to one of the great, classic American stories. The television miniseries of Alex Haley's Queen electrified and engrossed a nation. But that was only part of the picture; here now is the whole story, fleshed out in all its vivid detail and human drama - the journey of an American family as only Alex Haley could tell it.

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The depth of character development was splendid. - Goodreads
There is no doubt that Haley was a great writer. - Goodreads
Alex Haley's "Roots" writing continues with "Queen". - Goodreads

Review: Queen

User Review  - Dawn Wells - Goodreads

After reading roots I felt lead to read this book. Roots is written better but this story is very engrossing. Read full review

Review: Queen

User Review  - Ardonna Ward - Goodreads

It's a great story of how a biracial child of a slave mother and plantation owner father grew up and navigated the cruel and unjust worlds that she felt she didn't belong in. Read full review

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About the author (1993)

Alex Haley is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece Roots. With Malcolm X, he coauthored the Autobiography of Malcom X. He died in February 1992.
David Stevens is an Oscar-nominated screenwriter who coauthored "Breaker Morant" and directed the Emmy Award-winning miniseries "A Town Like Alice." He has written several other miniseries, including "Merlin," and his off-Broadway play "The Sum of Us" was made into a movie. He worked extensively with Alex Haley on the screenplay "Queen," and after Alex Haley died, he completed the unfinished book.

"From the Paperback edition.

Stevens is CEO of an on-line learning consultancy

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