early spring in massachusetts (Google eBook)

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1893
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Page 15 - And that the said grantee, his heirs and Assigns, shall and may from time to time, and at all times forever hereafter, by force and virtue of these presents, lawfully, peaceably, and quietly have, hold, use, occupy, possess, and enjoy the said demised and bargained premises...
Page 141 - ... summer may ever lie fair in my memory. May I dare as I have never done! May I persevere as I have never done! May I purify myself anew as with fire and water, soul and body! May my melody not be wanting to the season! May I gird myself to be a hunter of the beautiful, that naught escape me! May I attain to a youth never attained! I am eager to report the glory of the universe; may I be worthy to do it; to have got through with regarding human values, so as not to be distracted from regarding...
Page 346 - I ask to be melted. You can only ask of the metals that they be tender to the fire that melts them. To nought else can they be tender.
Page 66 - I felt that it would be to make myself the laughingstock of the scientific community to describe or attempt to describe to them that branch of science which specially interests me, inasmuch as they do not believe in a science which deals with the higher law. So I was obliged to speak to their condition and describe to them that poor part of me which alone they can understand.
Page 217 - I seek acquaintance with Nature to know her moods and manners. Primitive Nature is the most interesting to me. I take infinite pains to know all the phenomena of the spring, for instance, thinking that I have here the entire poem, and then, to my chagrin, I hear that it is but an imperfect copy that I possess and have read, that my ancestors have torn out many of the first leaves and grandest passages, and mutilated it in many places.
Page 214 - Man cannot afford to be a naturalist, to look at Nature directly, but only with the side of his eye. He must look through and beyond her. To look at her is as fatal as to look at the head of Medusa. It turns the man of science to stone.
Page 216 - But when I consider that the nobler animals have been exterminated here, the cougar, panther, lynx, wolverene, wolf, bear, moose, deer, the beaver, the turkey, etc., etc., I cannot but feel as if I lived in a tamed, and. as it were, emasculated country. Would not the motions of those larger and wilder animals have been more significant still? Is it not a maimed and imperfect nature that I am conversant with?
Page 48 - As for these communities, I think I had rather keep bachelor's hall in hell than go to board in heaven.
Page 55 - I learned to-day that my ornithology had done me no service. The birds I heard, which fortunately did not . come within the scope of my science, sung as freshly as if it had been the first morning of creation...
Page x - ... of feeling, but never weak or nearsighted ; the forehead not unusually broad or high, full of concentrated energy and purpose ; the mouth with prominent lips, pursed up with meaning and thought when silent, and giving out when open a stream of the most varied and unusual and instructive sayings.

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