Second Report of Progress in the Laboratory of the Survey at Harrisburg, Volume 43 (Google eBook)

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Board of Commissioners, 1879 - Geology, Economic - 438 pages
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Page 446 - REPORTS. A. HISTORICAL SKETCH OF GEOLOGICAL EXPLORATIONS in Pennsylvania and other States. By JP Lesley. With appendix, containing Annual Reports for 1874 and 1875 ; pp. 226, 8vo. Price in paper, $0 25 ; postage, $0 06.
Page 284 - The Upper Washington limestone is a fine stratum of such marked characteristics that it cannot be mistaken for any other in the series. In all portions it weathers to an almost snowy whiteness with the slightest tinge of blue. The upper part is quite slaty and is blue on the freshly exposed surface. The middle layers are dark, almost black, and frequently mottled with drab. They are exceedingly brittle, ring sharply when struck, and yield a limestone of superior quality . . . . The top and bottom...
Page iv - ARIO PARDEE, ---------- Hazleton. WILLIAM A. INGHAM, ------- Philadelphia. HENRY S. ECKERT, -------- Reading. HENRY MCCORMICK, -------- Harrisburg. JAMES MACFARLANE, -------- Towanda. JOHN B. PEARSE, - - - - Philadelphia. JOSEPH WILLCOX, -------- Philadelphia. Hon. DANIEL J. MORRELL, ------ Johnstown. HENRY W. OLIVER, - - - Pittsburgh. SAMUEL Q. BROWN, - - Pleasantville. SECRETARY OF THE BOARD. WILLIAM A. INGIIAM, Philadelphia. STATE GEOLOGIST. PETER LESLEY, Philadelphia. 188O. ASSISTANT GEOLOGISTS....
Page 412 - When all the burners are lighted, which usually takes about 30 minutes, they are allowed to burn turned on full for 25 minutes, the tube being at a full red heat all the time. The supply of oxygen is then stopped, the pinch-cock R put on and Q taken off, and a slow stream of air started through the apparatus to drive out the oxygen. This is done by pouring water into the upper bottle F, and allowing it to run into the lower one, in this way forcing the air through the apparatus. The lights are lowered...
Page 269 - Stinson, under my direction. 59. Fire-bricks. The physical connection of the standing up power of firebricks, with the chemical composition and manufacture of the brick, are discussed in a special report (given below) by Mr. Franklin Platt, on the basis of a series of tests made in an experimental shaft furnace at Harrisburg. The following analyses of bricks were made to illustrate this Report ; and they are therefore given here without comment : Clearfteld.
Page 285 - The lower portion is commonly more or less magnesian, breaks with a smooth surface which is sometimes lustreless, while 1. 2nd Geol. Survey of Penn. Report K p. 64. at others it is quite bright. This part is employed for the manufacture of cement at many places, and is available throughout eastern Washington county. It is the more persistent part of the mass, having been identified in Allegheny county on the Pittsburg and Steubenville pike. When exposed to the weather it eventually breaks up into...
Page 353 - Without discussing in detail, at present, this instructive table, several things are evident at a glance, viz: that 1. Alternate strata of limestone and dolomite make up the mass. This is most easily seen by running the eye down the fourth and fifth columns of figures. It will be noticed that beds 1, 2, beds 3a, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, beds 10, 11, beds 35, 36, beds 45, 46, beds 49, 50, beds 53, 54, beds 55, 56, beds 62, 63, 64. 65, 66, 67, beds 72, 73, 74, 75, beds 79, 80,...
Page 115 - ... months, it undergoes no sensible change in any respect; and that, on the other hand, when the coal becomes heated, it suffers precisely the same kind of change that was found by Richters to be effected in coal by heating it in contact with atmospheric air to a comparatively low temperature, namely loss of carbon and hydrogen by oxidation and increase of the absolute weight of the coal owing to the fixation of oxygen...
Page 131 - Does not ignite readily, but burns up to a clear, hot fire, constituting a good house coal. " d. Cannel Coal (Parrot Coal of Scotland). Of dense, compact, and even fracture, conchoidal in every direction. Takes a polish like jet. Splinters in the fire, and burns clearly and brightly. " 4. Anthracite, Stone Coal, or Culm. The densest, hardest, and most lustrous of all varieties. Burns with little flame and no smoke, but gives a great heat. Contains very little volatile matter. Splinters when...
Page 370 - Gregher's mill, and at an elevation above the present lake surface of say twenty feet. It is a lenticular deposit, thin at the edge, and thick at the center, occupying the principal part of a small swamp or basin between low hills of drift. A stratum of peat, about two feet thick, overlies the marl and supports the swamp vegetation covering the surface. Pits have been sunk where the marl is fifteen feet thick, and a boring near the center of the deposit was carried down twenty-two feet without reaching...

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