The Historical Register of the United States, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Thomas H. Palmer
G. Palmer, 1814 - United States
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Contents.--v. 1-2, From the declaration of war in 1812 to Jan. 1, 1814.--v. 3-4, For 1814.
  

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Page 118 - States a strong proof of his friendship, doth hereby cede to the said United States, in the name of the French Republic, forever and in full sovereignty, the said territory, with all its rights and appurtenances, as fully and in the same manner as they have been acquired by the French Republic, in virtue of the above-mentioned treaty, concluded with His Catholic Majesty.
Page 4 - It has become, indeed, sufficiently certain, that the commerce of the United States is to be sacrificed, not as interfering with the belligerent rights of Great Britain; not as supplying the wants of her enemies, which she herself supplies ; but as interfering with the monopoly which she covets for her own commerce and navigation. She carries on a war against the lawful commerce of a friend, that she may the better carry on a commerce with an enemy ; a commerce polluted by the forgeries and perjuries,...
Page 118 - Parma, the colony or province of Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should be after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States.
Page 3 - Not content with these occasional expedients for laying waste our neutral trade, the cabinet of...
Page 5 - ... the plea of a disposition in the United States to acquiesce in those edicts, originally the sole plea for them, received no attention. . If no other proof existed of a predetermination of the British Government against a repeal of its Orders, it might be found in the correspondence of the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States at London...
Page 31 - After thirty years of peace and prosperity the United States have been driven to arms. The injuries and aggressions, the insults and indignities of Great Britain have once more left them no alternative but manly resistance, or unconditional submission.
Page 295 - It has pleased the Almighty to give to the arms of the United States a signal victory over their enemies on this Lake. The British squadron, consisting of two ships, two brigs, one schooner, and one sloop, have this moment surrendered to the force under my command after a sharp conflict.
Page 296 - It was with unspeakable pain that I saw, soon after I got on board the Niagara, .the flag of the Lawrence come down, although I was perfectly sensible that she had been defended to the last ; and that to have continued to make a show of resistance would have been a wanton sacrifice of the remains of her brave crew. But the enemy was not able to take possession of her, and circumstances soon permitted her flag again to be hoisted. At forty-five minutes past 2 the signal was made for 'close action.
Page 296 - The Niagara being very little injured, I determined to pass through the enemy's line, bore up and passed ahead of their two ships and a brig, giving a raking fire to them from the starboard guns, and to a large schooner and sloop, from the larboard side, at half pistol shot distance.
Page 5 - Berlin decree, was willing in the event of its removal to repeal that decree, which, being followed by alternate repeals of the other offensive edicts, might abolish the whole system on both sides. This inviting opportunity for accomplishing an object so important to the United States, and professed so often to be the desire of both the belligerents, was made known to the British Government. As that Government...

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