Experimental Phenomenology: An Introduction

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SUNY Press, Jun 30, 1986 - Philosophy - 154 pages
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Experimental Phenomenology has already been lauded for the ease with which its author explains and demonstrates the kinds of consciousness by which we come to know the structure of objects and the structure of consciousness itself. The format of the book follows the progression of a number of thought experiments which mark out the procedures and directions of phenomenological inquiry. Making use of examples of familiar optical illusions and multi-stable drawings, Professor Ihde illustrates by way of careful and disciplined step-by-step analyses, how some of the main methodological procedures and epistemological concepts of phenomenology assume concrete relevance. Such formidable fare as epoche, noetic and noematic analysis, apodicticity, adequacy, sedimentation, imaginative variation, field, and fringe are rendered into the currency of familiar examples from the everyday world.
  

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Contents

Introduction Doing Phenomenology
13
Indians and the Elephant Phenomena and the Phenomenological Reductions
29
The Visual Field First Phenomenological Excursus
55
Illusions and MultiStable Phenomena A Phenomenological Deconstruction
67
Variations upon Deconstruction Possibilities and Topography
81
Expanded Variations and Phenomenological Reconstruction
91
Horizons Adequacy and Invariance
109
Projection Expanding Phenomenology
123
Interdisciplinary Phenomenology
135
Epilogue
152
Index of Names
155
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Don Ihde is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, as well as Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts. He is the author of several books.

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