Scenes in My Native Land (Google eBook)

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J. Munroe, 1845 - Atlantic States - 319 pages
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Page 316 - After God had carried us safe to New England, and we had builded our houses, provided necessaries for our livelihood, reared convenient places for God's worship, and settled the civil government, one of the next things we longed for and looked after was to advance learning and perpetuate it to posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches, when our present ministers shall lie in the dust.
Page 275 - ... to dive into the depths of dungeons; to plunge into the infection of hospitals; to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain; to take the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt; to remember the forgotten, to attend to the neglected, to visit the forsaken, and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries.
Page 178 - ... in vain we toiled, in vain we fought, we bled in vain, if you, our offspring, want valor to repel the assaults of her invaders ! Stain not the glory of your worthy ancestors ; but, like them, resolve never to part with your birthright.
Page 199 - ... sons of hell conspire To raise the stake, and light the fire; Know, that for such superior souls, There lies a bliss beyond the poles ; Where spirits shine with purer ray, And brighten to meridian day; Where Love, where boundless Friendship rules (No friends that change, no love that cools!) Where rising floods of knowledge roll, And pour and pour upon the soul!
Page 172 - I really think that pure passion for flowers," she wrote, in one of her notes at this time to Mrs Lawrence, " is the only one which long sickness leaves untouched with its chilling influence. Often during this weary illness of mine, have I looked upon new books with perfect apathy, when, if a friend has sent me a few flowers, my heart has ' leaped up' to their dreamy hues and odours, with a sudden sense of renovated childhood, which seems to me one of the mysteries of our being.
Page 156 - ... sought not association with mankind, to unfold or to increase his stores of "knowledge. Those who had heard him converse spoke with surprise and admiration of his colloquial powers, his command of language, and the spirit of eloquence that flowed from his lips. But he seldom, and sparingly, admitted this intercourse, studiously avoiding society, though there seemed in his nature nothing of moroseness or misanthropy. On the contrary, he showed kindness to even the humblest animal. Birds instinctively...
Page 224 - Denison, with a courage that deserved success, boldly met, and bravely fought, a combined British, Tory, and Indian force of thrice their number. Numerical superiority alone gave success to the invader, and widespread havoc, desolation and ruin marked his savage and bloody footsteps through the valley.
Page 122 - ... has passed, the expectation has gone on increasing. I do the same now; I anticipate what this plantation and that one will presently be, if only taken care of, and there is not a spot of which I do not watch the progress. Unlike building, or even painting, or indeed any other kind of pursuit, this has no end, and is never interrupted, but goes on from day to day, and from year to year, with a perpetually augmenting interest.
Page 44 - Farewell to Old Montauk, and gave thee thanks, Ultima Thule of that noble Isle Against whose breast the everlasting surge Long travelling on, and ominous of wrath, Incessant beats. Thou lift'st a blessed torch Unto the vexed and storm-tossed mariner, Guiding him safely on his course again ; So teach us mid our own dark ills to guard The lamp of charity, and with clear eye Look up to Heaven.
Page 227 - Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength . . . ;" and the Saviour himself appealed (Matt, xxi.) to the testimony of little children.

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