The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 214 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable, 1911
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Page 145 - Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour: England hath need of thee: she is a fen Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen, Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower, Have forfeited their ancient English dower Of inward happiness. We are selfish men. Oh! raise us up, return to us again; And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power.
Page 341 - Through tatter'd clothes small vices do appear ; Robes and furr'd gowns hide all. Plate sin with gold, And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks ; Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw does pierce it.
Page 52 - How sleep the Brave who sink to rest By all their country's wishes blest! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod. By fairy hands their knell is rung; By forms unseen their dirge is sung; There Honor comes, a pilgrim gray, To bless the turf that wraps their clay; And Freedom shall awhile repair, To dwell a weeping hermit there!
Page 135 - Who, whether praise of him must walk the earth For ever, and to noble deeds give birth, Or he must fall, to sleep without his fame. And leave a dead unprofitable name, Finds comfort in himself and in his cause ; And, while the mortal mist is gathering, draws His breath in confidence of Heaven's applause: This is the happy warrior; this is he That every man in arms should wish to be.
Page 75 - De tous les corps ensemble, on ne saurait en faire réussir une petite pensée : cela est impossible, et d'un autre ordre. De tous les corps et esprits, on n'en saurait tirer un mouvement de vraie charité : cela est impossible, et d'un autre ordre, surnaturel.
Page 135 - Who, if he rise to station of command, Rises by open means; and there will stand On honourable terms, or else retire, And in himself possess his own desire: Who comprehends his trust, and to the same, Keeps faithful with a singleness of aim...
Page 297 - Chancery a sort of Academy or Gymnasium, fit for persons of their station ; where they learn singing and all kinds of music, dancing and such other accomplishments and diversions (which are called revels) as are suitable to their quality, and such as are usually practised at Court.
Page 135 - THE HAPPY WARRIOR. WHO is the happy Warrior ? Who is he That every Man in arms should wish to be ? It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought Upon the plan that pleased his childish thought...
Page 143 - Men that adore times past consider not that those times were once present, that is, as our own are at this instant ; and we ourselves unto those to come, as they unto us at present : as we rely on them, even so will those on us, and magnify us hereafter, who at present condemn ourselves. Which very absurdity is daily committed amongst us, even in the esteem and censure of our own times. And, to speak impartially, old men, from whom we should expect the greatest example of wisdom, do most exceed in...
Page 145 - GREAT men have been among us ; hands that penned And tongues that uttered wisdom — better none : The later Sidney, Marvel, Harrington, Young Vane, and others who called Milton friend.

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