A Little Princess

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 2011 - Juvenile Fiction - 201 pages
14 Reviews
When Sara's privileged status at her boarding school comes to an abrupt end, the former favorite finds herself penniless and at the mercy of a vindictive headmistress. This Victorian-era tale's use of imagination and generosity to make the best of life and losses remains a source of inspiration and enchantment.
  

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Thanks Overstock for helping me find perfect gift!

User Review  - carolinmichigan - Overstock.com

I was looking for this book at the request of a special little girl. It was on her Christmas list and no book stores had it. Overstock came through and I got it in time to wrap it for Christmas. Thanks Overstock for another special Christmas gift I found on your site! Read full review

Every Girl is Truly a Princess

User Review  - MissBosnian - Borders

One of my all time favorite classics, this book teaches you to be strong when times seem impossible to get through, and although it is a children's book and it does seem childish at times, the magic ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Sara
1
A French Lesson
12
Ermengarde
18
Lottie
26
Becky
35
The DiamondMines
45
The DiamondMines Again
55
In the Attic
74
Ram Dass
107
The Other Side of the Wall
116
One of the Populace
124
What Melchisedec Heard and Saw
134
The Magic
139
The Visitor
162
It Is the Child
177
I Tried Not to Be
184

Melchisedec
84
The Indian Gentleman
95
Anoe
195
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About the author (2011)

Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote for children and adults, publishing both plays and novels. She was born in Manchester, England, on November 24, 1849. Her father, who owned a furniture store, died when she was only four years old. Her mother struggled to keep the family business running while trying to raise five children. Finally, because of the failing Manchester economy, the family sold the store and immigrated to the United States. In 1865 they settled just outside of Knoxville, Tennessee. Hoping to offset her family's continuing financial troubles, Burnett began to submit her stories to women's magazines. She was immediately successful. In the late 1860s her stories were published in nearly every popular American magazine. Burnett helped to support her family with income from the sale of her stories, even saving enough to finance a trip back to England, where she stayed for over a year. In 1879, Burnett published her first stories for children; two of her most popular are A Little Princess and The Secret Garden. In contrast to an extremely successful career, Burnett's personal life held many challenges. Her son Lionel was diagnosed with tuberculosis at age 15, from which he never recovered. His death inspired several stories about dead or dying children. Burnett lived her later years on Long Island, New York. She died in 1924.

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