Writings, 1932-1946

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Library of America, 1998 - Fiction - 844 pages
5 Reviews
The second in a two-volume set furnishes Stein's later literary masterpieces, including Stanzas in Meditation, Lectures in America, and The Geographical History of America, and details her relationship with Picasso and the public figures that inspired her works.

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Review: Writings 1903-1932 (Library of America #99)

User Review  - Spencer - Goodreads

Well--she's about as annoying as Ayn Rand seems to think she is, but she's nowhere near as annoying as Ayn Rand. Read full review

Review: Writings 1903-1932 (Library of America #99)

User Review  - Ben - Goodreads

Most important writer of the twentieth century? The young often when they have learnt all they can learn accuse her of an inordinate pride. She says yes of course. She realises that in english ... Read full review

Contents

The Geographical History of America
365
Three Sisters Who Are Not Sisters
705
Note on the Texts
838
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Gertrude Stein was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, on February 3, 1874, to an affluent Jewish family, spent her early childhood in Vienna and Paris, and later grew up in Oakland, California. At Radcliffe College she studied under William James, who remained her lifelong friend, and then went to Johns Hopkins to study medicine. Abandoning her studies, she moved to Paris with her brother Leo in 1903. At 27 rue de Fleurus, Gertrude Stein lived with Alice B. Toklas, who would remain her companion for forty years. Not only was she an innovator in literature and a supporter of modern poetry and art, she was the friend and mentor of those who visited her at her now-famous home: Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Jean Cocteau, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sherwood Anderson, and Guillaume Appollinaire. Her first important book was Three Lives (1909), then Tender Buttons (1914), followed by her magnum opus, The Making of Americans (1925), and the book which became a huge popular success, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1933). Just before her death at the age of 72 on July 27, 1946, she asked Alice Toklas from her hospital bed, “What is the answer?” Getting no answer, she then asked, “In that case, what is the question?”

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