Prismatic and diffraction spectra: memoirs (Google eBook)

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American Book Co., 1899 - Spectrum analysis - 67 pages
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Page 73 - THE STUDENTS' LYELL A Manual of Elementary Geology. Edited by JOHN' W. JUDD, CB, LL.D., FRS, Professor of Geology, and Dean of the Royal College of Science, London. With a Geological Map, and 736 Illustrations in the Text. New, revised edition. Crown 8vo, Cloth, $2 25 ; by mail, $2 39. The progress of geological science during the last quarter of a century has rendered necessary very considerable additions and corrections, and the rewriting of large portions of the book, but I have everywhere striven...
Page 63 - By candlelight a different set of appearances may be distinguished. When a very narrow line of the blue light at the lower part of the flame is examined alone, in the same manner, through a prism, the spectrum, instead of appearing a series of lights of different hues contiguous, may be seen divided into five images at a distance from each other. The first is broad red, terminated by a bright line of yellow ; the...
Page 73 - ... or by experiment. Directions are given for the collection of specimens, for their preservation, and for preparing them for examination; also for performing simple physiological experiments.
Page 63 - When the object viewed is a blue line of electric light I have found the spectrum to be also separated into several images, but the phenomena are somewhat different from the preceding. It is, however, needless to describe minutely appearances which vary according to the brilliancy of the light, and which I cannot undertake to explain.
Page 73 - Systematic Zoology until the student has mastered those structural affinities upon which true classification is founded ; and in being fitted for High Schools and Mixed Schools by its language and illustrations, yet going far enough to constitute a complete grammar of the science for the undergraduate course of any college. INTRODUCTION TO ELEMENTARY PRACTICAL BIOLOGY A Laboratory Guide for High Schools and College Students. By CHARLES WRIGHT DODGE, MS, Professor of Biology, University of Rochester.
Page 62 - The line A that bounds the red side of the spectrum is somewhat confused, which seems in part owing to want of power in the eye to converge red light. The line B, between red and green, in a certain position of the prism, is perfectly distinct; so also are D and E, the two limits of violet. But C, the limit of green and blue, is not so clearly marked as the rest ; and there are also, on each side of this limit, other distinct dark lines, / and g, either of which, in an imperfect experiment, might...
Page 62 - If a beam of daylight be admitted into a dark room by a crevice -fa of an inch broad, and received by the eye at the distance of 10 to 12 feet through a prism of flint glass, free from veins, held near the eye, the beam is seen to be separated into the four following colours only, red, yellowish green, blue, and violet, in the proportions represented in fig.
Page 16 - ... part of the aforesaid pieces of brass ; then the telescope is placed at the zero of the division on each support, and the index of the small mirror moved until the same object is seen in the field of the telescope. If the object appear exactly at the intersection of the wires, it will be a proof that the axis of the telescope is parallel to the plane of the instrument, and in all observations, the proof lines of the repelling screw of each support must be placed at the corresponding points of...
Page 74 - ... and clearness of expression. . . . The treatment of each subject is wonderfully up to date for a text-book, and does credit to the system which keeps Johns Hopkins abreast of the times. Merely as an example of lucid expression and of systematization the book is worthy of careful reading.
Page 74 - University. A MANUAL OF EXPERIMENTS IN PHYSICS Laboratory Instruction for College Classes. By JOSEPH S. AMES, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics in Johns Hopkins University, author of "Theory of Physics," and WILLIAM JA BLISS, Associate in Physics in Johns Hopkins University. 8vo, Cloth, $1 80 ; by mail, $1 95. I have examined the book, and am greatly pleased with it. It is clear and well arranged, and has the best and newest methods. I can cheerfully recommend it as a most excellent work of its...

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