Brave New World

Front Cover
Harper Collins, 1932 - Fiction - 268 pages
28 Reviews
A fantasy of the future that sheds a blazing critical light on the present--considered to be Aldous Huxley's most enduring masterpiece.

"Mr. Huxley is eloquent in his declaration of an artist's faith in man, and it is his eloquence, bitter in attack, noble in defense, that, when one has closed the book, one remembers."
--Saturday Review of Literature

"A Fantastic racy narrative, full of much excellent satire and literary horseplay."
--Forum

"It is as sparkling, provocative, as brilliant, in the appropriate sense, as impressive ads the day it was published. This is in part because its prophetic voice has remained surprisingly contemporary, both in its particular forecasts and in its general tone of semiserious alarm. But it is much more because the book succeeds as a work of art...This is surely Huxley's best book."
--Martin Green

  

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Writing style: 3 out of 5 stars. - Goodreads
Inconsistent plot line runs through this book. - Goodreads
The premise of the book I find quite interesting. - Goodreads

Review: Brave New World

User Review  - Dale Pearl - Goodreads

This book is on many a top 100 reading list. Aldous Huxley has the reputation of being an intellectual giant. His heritage places him in the land of England, the place where all of the great literary ... Read full review

Review: Brave New World

User Review  - Lit Bug - Goodreads

There are two standard ways of reading ideological science-fiction to go looking for subtle nuances that characterize standard literary fiction, stressing upon characterization and plot as an ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
19
Section 3
30
Section 4
107
Section 5
123
Section 6
140
Section 7
146
Section 8
153
Section 9
172
Section 10
186
Section 11
198
Section 12
208
Section 13
217
Section 14
230
Section 15
241
Copyright

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About the author (1932)

Aldous Huxley was born on July 26, 1894, in Surrey, England, into a distinguished scientific and literary family; his grandfather was the noted scientist and writer, T.H. Huxley. Following an eye illness at age 16 that resulted in near-blindness, Huxley abandoned hope of a career in medicine and turned instead to literature, attending Oxford University and graduating with honors. While at Oxford, he published two volumes of poetry. Crome Yellow, his first novel, was published in 1927 followed by Antic Hay, Those Barren Leaves, and Point Counter Point. His most famous novel, Brave New World, published in 1932, is a science fiction classic about a futuristic society controlled by technology. In all, Huxley produced 47 works during his long career, In 1947, Huxley moved with his family to southern California. During the 1950s, he experimented with mescaline and LSD. Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell, both works of nonfiction, were based on his experiences while taking mescaline under supervision. In 1959, Aldous Huxley received the Award of Merit for the Novel from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He died on November 22, 1963.