Shakespeare's bones: The proposal to disinter them, considered in relation to their possible bearing on his portraiture: illustrated by instances of visits of the living to the dead (Google eBook)

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Trübner & co., 1883 - Exhumation - 48 pages
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Page 46 - Blese be y man y' spares thes stones And cvrst be he y
Page 26 - ... other foreign body, was carefully washed off, and the plaster of Paris applied with all the tact and accuracy Of an experienced artist. The cast is admirably taken, and cannot fail to prove highly interesting to phrenologists and others. 'Having completed our intention, the skull, securely enclosed in a leaden case, was again committed to the earth, precisely where we found it. ARCHD. BLA.CKLOCK.
Page 25 - The forehead and temples had lost little or nothing of their muscular substance; the cartilage of the nose was gone ; but the left eye, in the first moment of exposure, was open and full, though it vanished almost immediately : and the pointed beard, so characteristic of the reign of King Charles, was perfect. The shape of the face was a long oval ; many of the teeth remained ; and the left...
Page 25 - ... eye, in the first moment of exposure, was open and full, though it vanished almost immediately; and the pointed beard, so characteristic of the period of the reign of King Charles, was perfect. The shape of the face was a long oval; many of the teeth remained: and the left ear, in consequence of tlie interposition of the unctuous matter between it and the cerecloth, was found entire.
Page 25 - A square opening was then made in the upper part of the lid, of such dimensions as to admit a clear insight into its contents. These were an internal wooden coffin, very much decayed, and the body carefully wrapped up in cerecloth, into the folds of which a quantity of unctuous or greasy matter, mixed with resin, as it seems, had been melted, so as to exclude, as effectually as possible, the external air.
Page 22 - The head of Oliver Cromwell (and it is believed the genuine one) has been brought forth in the city, and is exhibited as a favour to such curious persons as the proprietor chooses to oblige. An offer was made this morning to bring it to Soho Square to show it to Sir Joseph Banks, but he desired to be excused from seeing the remains of the old Villanous Republican, the mention of whose very name makes his blood boil with indignation. The same offer was made to Sir Joseph forty years ago, which he...
Page 25 - Body, carefully wrapped up in cere-cloth, into the folds of which a quantity of unctuous or greasy matter, mixed with resin, as it seemed, had been melted, so as to exclude, as effectually as possible, the external air. The coffin was completely full ; and, from the tenacity of the cere-cloth, great difficulty was experienced in detaching it successfully from the parts which it enveloped. Wherever the unctuous matter had insinuated itself, the...
Page 21 - ... On the 4th of August, 1790, according to a small volume written by Philip Neve, Esq. (of which two editions were published in the same year), Milton's coffin was removed and his remains exhibited to the public on the 4th and 5th of that month. Mr. George Stevens, the great editor of Shakspere, who justly denounced the indignity intended, not offered, to the great Puritan poet's remains by Royalist Landsharks, satisfied himself that the corpse was that of a woman of fewer years than Milton. ....
Page 24 - The vault is covered by an arch, half a brick in thickness, is seven feet two inches in width, nine feet six inches in length, and four feet ten inches in height, and is situated in the centre of the choir, opposite the eleventh knight's stall, on the sovereign's side.
Page 23 - Swedenborg,' 2d ed., 1868, p. 675) ' were carried off. Dr. Spurgin told me he possessed the cartilage of an ear. Exposed to the air, the flesh quickly fell to dust, and a skeleton was all that remained for subsequent visitors. ... At a funeral in 1817, Granholm, an officer in the Swedish Navy, seeing the lid of Swedenborg's coffin loose, abstracted the skull, and hawked it about amongst London Swedenborgians, but none would buy. Dr. Wahlin, pastor of the Swedish Church, recovered what he supposed...

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