Shakespeare's history of King Henry the Sixth... (Google eBook)

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Harper & brothers, 1895 - Drama
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Page 124 - And as I thrust thy body in with my sword, So wish I, I might thrust thy soul to hell. Hence will I drag thee headlong by the heels Unto a dunghill which shall be thy grave, And there cut off thy most ungracious head, Which I will bear in triumph to the king,
Page 36 - and these honours die? Shall Henry's conquest, Bedford's vigilance, Your deeds of war, and all our counsel die ? O peers of England, shameful is this league! Fatal this marriage, cancelling your fame, Blotting your names from books of memory, Razing the characters of your renown, Defacing monuments of conquer'd France, Undoing all, as all had never been
Page 116 - Say. What of that? Cade. Marry, thou oughtest not to let thy horse wear a cloak, when honester men than thou go in their hose and doublets. Dick. And work in their shirt too; as myself, for example, that am a butcher Say. You men of Kent,— Dick. What say you of Kent
Page 122 - And now is York in arms to second him.— I pray thee, Buckingham, go and meet him, And ask him what's the reason of these arms. Tell him I 'll send Duke Edmund to the Tower;— And, Somerset, we will commit thee thither, Until his army be dismiss'd from him. 40 Somerset. My lord, I
Page 96 - So Suffolk had thy heavenly company: For where thou art, there is the world itself, With every several pleasure in the world, And where thou art not, desolation. I can no more : live thou to joy thy life ; Myself to joy in nought but that thou liv'st. Enter VAUX. Queen. Whither goes Vaux so fast? what news, I
Page 19 - Strangers in court do take her for the queen : She bears a duke's revenues on her back, And in her heart she scorns our poverty. Shall I not live to be aveng'd on her ? Contemptuous base-born callat as she is, She vaunted 'mongst her minions t'other day, The very train of her worst wearing gown Was better
Page 41 - Then will I raise aloft the milk-white rose, With whose sweet smell the air shall be perfum'd, And in my standard bear the arms of York, To grapple with the house of Lancaster; And, force perforce, I 'll make him yield the crown, Whose bookish rule hath pull'd fair England down. [Exit, "SCENE II. The Duke of
Page 136 - Shall be eterniz'd in all age to come.— Sound drums and trumpets !—and to London all; And more such days as these to us befall! [Exeunt. NOTES. ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THE NOTES. Abbott (or Gr.), Abbott's Shakespearian Grammar (third edition). AS, Anglo-Saxon. AV, Authorized Version of the Bible (1611). B. and F., Beaumont and Fletcher. BJ, Ben
Page 38 - be protector. Buckingham. Or thou or I, Somerset, will be protector, Despite Duke Humphrey or the cardinal. [Exeunt Buckingham and Somerset. Salisbury. Pride went before, ambition follows him. While these do labour for their own preferment, Behoves it us to labour for the realm. I never saw but Humphrey Duke of Gloster
Page 42 - O Nell, sweet Nell, if thou dost love thy lord, Banish the canker of ambitious thoughts; And may that thought, when I imagine ill Against my king and nephew, virtuous Henry, ğ Be my last breathing in this mortal world! My troublous dream this night doth make me sad. Duchess. What dream'd my lord ? tell me, and I

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