The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

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Penguin, 2006 - Business & Economics - 436 pages
149 Reviews
An informed and excoriating attack on the tragic waste, futility, and hubris of the West's efforts to date to improve the lot of the so-called developing world, with constructive suggestions on how to move forward.

William Easterly's The White Man's Burden is about what its author calls the twin tragedies of global poverty. The first, of course, is that so many are seemingly fated to live horribly stunted, miserable lives and die such early deaths. The second is that after fifty years and more than $2.3 trillion in aid from the West to address the first tragedy, it has shockingly little to show for it. We'll never solve the first tragedy, Easterly argues, unless we figure out the second.

The ironies are many: We preach a gospel of freedom and individual accountability, yet we intrude in the inner workings of other countries through bloated aid bureaucracies like the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank that are accountable to no one for the effects of their prescriptions. We take credit for the economic success stories of the last fifty years, like South Korea and Taiwan, when in fact we deserve very little. However, we reject all accountability for pouring more than half a trillion dollars into Africa and other regions and trying one "big new idea" after another, to no avail. Most of the places in which we've meddled are in fact no better off or are even worse off than they were before. Could it be that we don't know as much as we think we do about the magic spells that will open the door to the road to wealth?

Absolutely, William Easterly thunders in this angry, irreverent, and important book. He contrasts two approaches: (1) the ineffective planners' approach to development-never able to marshal enough knowledge or motivation to get the overambitious plans implemented to attain the plan's arbitrary targets and (2) a more constructive searchers' approach-always on the lookout for piecemeal improvements to poor peoples' well-being, with a system to get more aid resources to those who find things that work. Once we shift power and money from planners to searchers, there's much we can do that's focused and pragmatic to improve the lot of millions, such as public health, sanitation, education, roads, and nutrition initiatives. We need to face our own history of ineptitude and learn our lessons, especially at a time when the question of our ability to "build democracy," to transplant the institutions of our civil society into foreign soil so that they take root, has become one of the most pressing we face.
  

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From the title to the depressing premise. - Goodreads
I think he should have done better/more research. - Goodreads
It's only a starting point though. - Goodreads

Review: The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

User Review  - Carolyn Cotterman - Goodreads

So disappointing. Maybe someone who is completely unfamiliar with the field of development would find this book educational? I just thought that everything I read was either completely obvious and over-explained or unsubstantiated. I couldn't make it to the end. Read full review

Review: The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

User Review  - Ramtin Poustnichi - Goodreads

The white mans burden was a very informing Non-Fiction book by the economist William Easterly that mainly revolved around the topic of aid for poor countries and why that aid has not actually helped ... Read full review

Contents

chapter one Planners Versus Searchers
3
chapter two The Legend of the Big Push
37
chapter three You Cant Plan a Market
60
chapter four Planners and Gangsters
112
chapter five The Rich Have Markets the Poor
165
chapter six Bailing Out the Poor
210
Triumph and Tragedy
238
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About the author (2006)

William Easterly is a professor of economics at New York University and a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. He was a senior research economist at the World Bank for more than sixteen years. In addition to his academic work, he has written widely in recent years for The Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Forbes, and Foreign Policy, among others. He is the author of the acclaimed book The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics. He has worked in many areas of the developing world, most extensively in Africa, Latin America, and Russia.

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